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UlsriVER5ITY OF PITTSBURGH 




Y257 
N56N269 
12 



Uarlington iVl.einorial jLibrary 



Price Thirty Cents. 







HARPER'S MAGAZINE. 

The great design of Harper's is to give correct information and rational amusement 
to the great masses of the people. There are few intelligent American families in which 
Harper'' s Magazine would not be an appreciated and highly welcome guest. There is 
no monthly Magazine an intelligent reading family can less afford to be without. Many 
Magazines are accumulated. Harper's is edited. There is not a Magazine that is print- 
ed which shows more intelligent pains expended on its articles and mechanical execu- 
tion. There is not a cheaper Magazine published. There is not, confessedly, a more 
popular Magazine in the world. — Nexu England Homestead. 

A repository of biography and history, literature, science, and art, unequaled by.any 
other American publication. * * * The volumes are as valuable as a mere work of 
reference as any cyclopaedia we can place in our libraries. Harper''s Magazine is a 
record of travel every where since the hour of its establishment. Livingstone and 
Gordon Gumming in Africa, Strain among the Andes and Ross Browne in the East, 
Speke on the Nile and Macgregor on the Jordan — indeed, all recent travelers of note 
— have seen their most important discoveries reproduced in these pages. Most of our 
younger and many of our older writers find here their literary biography. Our artists 
see the best evidences of their genius and the most enduring specimens of their work 
in the Magazine. — N. Y. Standard. 



HARPER'S WEEKLY. 

Harper's WeeJdy is an illustrated record of and commentary upon the events of 
the times. It treats of every topic, Political, Historical,_ Literary, and Scientific, which 
is of current interest, and gives the finest illustrations that can be obtained from 
every available source, original or foreign. This journal contains one-third more 
reading-matter, a larger number of Illustrations, and is conspicuously better Edited 
and Printed than any other Illustrated Newspaper. Its circulation is about 130,000 — 
more than four times that of any similar publication. 

A nev/ serial story by Wilkie Gollins, entitled " Poor Miss Finch," was com- 
menced in Harper's Weekly for September 2. It is marked by all the brilliancy of 
style, fascination of character, and intensity of development which render this author 
the most popular of living novelists. New Subscribers will be supplied with the Weekly 
from No. 766 [for September 2], in which Number Wilkie Gollins's story began, to the 
close of the year 1871, four months, for One Dollar. 



HARPER'S BAZAR. 

Free from all political and sectarian discussion, devoted to fashion, pleasure, and 
instruction, it is just the agreeable, companionable, and interesting domestic paper 
which every mother and wife and sweet-heart will require every son, husband, and lover 
to bring home with him every Saturday evening. — Philadelphia Ledger. 

It is really the only illustrated chronicler of fashion in the country. Its supple- 
ments alone are worth the subscription price of the paper. While fully maintaining 
its position as a mirror of fashion, it also contains stories, poems, brilliant essays, 
besides general and personal gossip. — Boston Saturday Eveiiing Gazette. 

There never was any paper published that so delighted the heart of woman. 
Never mind if it does cost you a new bonnet ; it will save you ten times the price in 
the household economy it teaches. — Providence Journal. 



TERMS FOR 1872. 

Harper's Magazine, One Year {^4 00 

Harper's Weekly, One Year 4 cx) 

Harper's Bazar, One Year 4 00 

Harper's Magazine, Harper's Weekly, and Harper's Bazar, to one address, for one year, 

$10 00 ; or any two for $7 00. 

An Extra Copy of eitlier the Magazine, Weekly, or Bazar ivill be supplied gratis for every 
Five Subscribers at #4 00 each, in one remittance ; or Six Copies for $20 00, without extra copy. 

In remitting by mail, a Post-Office Order or Draft payable to the order of Harper & 

Brothers is preferable to Bank Notes, since, should the Order or Draft be lost or stolen, it can be 

-enewed without loss to the sender. The Post-Office Department recommends that, when neither of 

esc can be procured, the money be sent in a Registered Letter. The registration fee has 

n reduced to fifteen cents, and the present registration system, the postal authorities claim, is vir- 

' an absolute protection against losses by mail. All Postmasters are obliged to register letters 

requested. 



4 



A 




TIME PROVES ALL THINGS. 



i 

A 




Frontispiece 2 

Almanac, Eclipses, etc 4 

Calendar 5-16 

Voyage of Life, by Sbakspeare 1 7-24 

Ye Gambolier, by John Hay 25 

The late Benjamin Franklin, by Mark Twain 26, 27 

Casablanca; or, the obstinate Sailorrboj', by G. P. WebsteiSs..,. ',,',„. 2S, 29 

Sam Weller's Moral Tale, by Charles Dickens J. . r. r/. . 30-32 

Jane Bludsoe, of Natchez, by Frank Bellevv 32-34 

Hov.' tu pick out a good Hoss, by Josh Billings 35, 36 

Aunt Jerusha, by S. S. Conant 36-39 

The early Training of Nasby 40 

A Night's Pleasure, by W. M. Thackeray 41-46 

Advice to little Girls, by Mark Twain 47 

The Be<rgar-maid, by A. Tennyson 4S, 49 

Ye true Story of Little Red Riding-Hood, by Alfred Mills 50-57 

My Mother, by G. P. Webster .*. 5S, 59 

Rates of Postage 60-62 

Distances to various Parts of the World 63,64 

Difference of Time -. 64 

Length of principal Rivers 64 

And over 130 Illustrations by Thomas Nast. 




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, by Hakpf.r & Brotheks, in the Office 
of the Librarian of Congress, at Washingt )d. 




mmVlltmmiWlMinmiJIMlHfBMBMllMMHBMggBMBMMBllHjfHIlMlllOOl 






'V//r 



ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

MADE IK OLOOK-TIME BY 8A-VDEL H. WEIGHT, A.M., M.D., PE>TJ TAN, 
YATES COUNTY, N. Y. 

Eclipses for ISrS. 
There will be four Eclipses this year, two of the Sun and two of 
the Moon, as follows : 

I. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, May 22d ; invisible. 

II. Au Annular Eclipse of the Sun, June 5th ; invisible except in 
the Arctic regions. 

III. A small Partial Eclipse of the Moon, in the evening of Nov. 
1-lth and nioruiug of the 15th ; risible, but only one thirty-third of 
the diameter of the Moon, on its northern limb. The eclipse lasts 
fortv minutes. It begins as follows : 



Boston, 15th, Oh. 15m. mo. 
Portland, 15th, Oh. ISm. mo. 
New York, 15th, Oh. 3m. mo. 
Rochester, 14th, llh. 48m. ev. 
Washington, 14th, llh. 51m. ev. 



Philadelphia, 14th, llh. 5Sm. ev. 
Buffalo, 14th, llh. 44m. ev. 
Chicago, 14th, llh. 9m. ev. 
Detroit, 14th, llh. 27m. ev. 
St. Louis, 14th, lOh. 5Sm. ev. 



IV. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, Nov. 30th ; invisible in the 
United States. 



nvtoming Stars. 
Venus until July 15th. 
Mars from and after May 17th. 
JupiTEK after August 2d. 
Saturn to April 30th. 



Evening Stars 
Venus after July 15th. 
Mars until May 17th. 
JuPiTEii until August 2d. 
Saturn after April lOih. 



Planets Bris;li.test. 

Merccrv, January 27th, May 25th, and September 18th, the planet 

rising then before the Suu : also April 9d, July Slsr, and November 

24th, setting then after the Sun. Venus not this year. Mars not this 

year. Jupiter, January 15th, and Saturn, July 9th, rising at sunset. 

The Eo\xr Seasons. 

D. H. M. 

Winter begins 1S71, Dec. 23 51 mo., and lasts 

Spring beglui 1S72, Mar. 20 1 49 mo., " 

SuMMEB begins 1S72, June 20 10 23 ev., " 

Autumn begins 1872, Sept. 22 46 ev., " 

Winter begins 1872. Dec. 21 6 45 mo., Tropical year, 3G5 5 54 

Cxcles, *»tc. 



Dominical Letters G, F. 

Epact 20. 

Solar Cycle 5. 

Golden Number 11. 

Roman Indiction 15. 







■^ ''>kt/~. 




Jewish Lunar Cycle . , 8. 

Dionysian Period 201. 

Julian Period 6585. 

Good Friday March 29. 

Easter Sunday March 31. 




1st Month. 



JANUARY, 1872. 



31 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. D. 



BOSTON. 



NEW YORK. WASHINGTON. 



CHIOAaO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



Last Quaktee. . 

New Moon 

First Quabtek. 
Fdll Moon 



3 
10 
17 
25 



5 15 E. 

10 14 M. 

7 18 M. 

30 E. 



H. 

5 

10 

7 



M. 

3 E. 

2 M. 

6 M. 



18 E. 



H. M. 

4 51 E. 

9 50 M. 

6 54 M. 

6 E. 



H. M. 

4 9 E. 

9 8 M. 

6 12 M. 

11 24 M. 



H. H. 

3 58 E. 

8 57 M. 

6 1 M. 

11 13 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



Moon 
South. 



Moon's 
Place. 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun' 
Rises. 

H. M. 



Sun 

Sets. 



Moon 
Rises. 



High 
Water. 



1 Monday 4 15 ^ 18 7 30 4 39 10 15 3 22 7 25 4 44 10 16 ev. 7 7 19 4 49 10 18 

2 Tuesday 4 69 TTU 1 7 30 4 40 11 19 4 5 7 25 4 45 11 20 52 7 19 4 50 11 21 

3 Wednesday 5 44 im 14 7 30 4 41 moen. 4 55 7 25 4 46 morn. 3 42 7 19 4 51 morn. 

4 Thursday 6 29 TTJI 27 7 30 4 42 24 5 48 7 25 4 47 24 2 34 7 19 4 52 23 

5 Friday 7 17 ^ 11 7 30 4 43 1 34 6 45 7 25 4 48 1 32 3 31 7 19 4 52 1 30 

6 Saturday 8 8 ^ 25 7 29 4 44 2 46 7 47 7 25 4 49 2 43 4 32 7 19 4 53 2 4 
1) First Sunday after Epiphany. $ in iii. Day's length at New York, 9h. 24m. 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 
Rises. 



High 
Water. 



Washington, 
Md., Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



Sun 
Sets. 

H. M. 



Moon 
Rises. 



7 Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 

12 Friday 

13 Saturday. 



9 4 


m 10 


7 29 


4 44 


4 2 


8 51 


7 25 


4 49 


3 68 


5 36 


7 19 


4 54 


10 5 


m 25 


7 29 


4 45 


5 19 


9 54 


7 24 


4 60 


5 13 


6 40 


7 19 


4 66 


11 10 


# 10 


7 29 


4 46 


6 34 


10 56 


7 24 


4 51 


6 28 


7 38 


7 19 


4 56 


EV.16 


# 25 


7 29 


4 47 


sets. 


11 52 


7 24 


4 62 


sets. 


8 35 


7 19 


4 67 


1 20 


V3 n 


7 29 


4 48 


6 10 


morn. 


7 24 


4 53 


6 16 


9 31 


7 19 


4 68 


2 20 


V3 25 i7 28 


4 50 


7 29 


45 


7 23 


4 54 


7 32 


10 22 


|7 18 


4 69 


3 15 


^ 10 


7 28 


4 51 


8 44 


1 37 


7 23 


'4 55 


8 46 


11 9 


|7 18 


5 



3 53 
5 
6 22 

sets. 

6 20 

7 36 

8 49 



2) Second Sunday after Epiphany. ,5 in V3. Day's length at New York, 9h. 33m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 5 


^ 24 


17 28 


4 62 


9 54 


2 26 


7 23 


4 56 


9 56 


11 57 


|7 18 


5 1 


4 55 


X 7 


7 27 


4 63 


11 2 


3 12 


7 22 


4 67 


11 2 


MORN. 


7 18 


5 2 


5 37 


^ 20 


\7 27 


4 64 


morn. 


3 58 


7 22 


4 59 


morn. 


44 


7 17 


5 3 


6 21 


T 3 


7 26 


4 55 


8 


4 47 


7 21 


5 


8 


1 33 


7 17 


5 5 


7 5 


f 15 


7 26 


4 66 


1 9 


5 39 


7 21 


5 1 


1 8 


2 26 


7 16 


5 6 


7 49 


T 27 


7 25 


4 58 


2 12 


6 31 


7 21 


5 2 


2 9 


3 17 


7 16 


5 7 


8 36 


« 9 


7 24 


4 59 


3 13 


7 24 


7 20 


6 3 


3 9 


4 10 


7 15 


5 8 



9 56 
11 2 

MORN. 
6 

1 6 

2 6 

3 5 



3) Third Sunday after Epiphany. if in n. Day's length at New York, 9h. 45m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



9 23 


« 21 


7 24 


5 





4 13 


8 19 


7 19 


5 4 


4 9 


5 4 


7 15 


5 9j 


10 13 


n 3 


7 23 


5 


1 


5 11 


9 11 


7 18 


6 5 


5 5 


5 67 


7 14 


5 10 


11 2 


n 16 


7 22 


5 


3 


6 5 


10 1 


7 17 


6 7 


5 59 


6 47 


7 14 


5 n 


11 52 


n 26 


7 22 


5 


4 


rises. 


10 49 


7 17 


5 8 


RISES. 


7 33 


7 13 


5 12 


MORN. 


© 8 


7 21 


5 


5 


5 2 


11 31 


7 16 


5 9 


6 7 


8 14 


7 12 


5 13 


41 


© 21 


7 20 


5 


6 


6 3 


EV.ll 


7 16 


5 10 


6 7 


8 57 


7 12 


5 15 


1 28 


^ 3 


|7 19 


5 


8 


7 6 


52 


7 15 


6 11 


7 9 


9 38i 


7 n 


5 16 



4 3 

4 59 

5 53 

RISES. 

5 12 

6 11 

7 12 



4) Septuagesima Sunday. 



^ in ^ . 



Day's length at New York, 9h. 59m. 



28 Sunday 

29 Monday 

130 .Tuesday 

131 [Wednesday 



2 14 


^, 15 


7 18 


5 9 


8 9 


1 32 


7 14 


5 13 


8 11 


2 68 


S}. 28 


7 17 


5 10 


9 11 


2 11 


7 13 


5 14 


9 12 


3 42 


TIE 11 


7 16 


5 12 


10 15 


2 50 


7 12 


5 15 


10 15 


4 26 


TTH 24 


i7 15 


6 13 


11 22 


3 32 


j7 12 


5 16 


11 20 



10 1717 

10 .53 7 

11 34|7 
Ey.l8|7 



10!5 17, 8 ]3 

95 18 9 13 
8 5 19 10 16 
815 2011 19 



PISCES. 




2d Month. 



FEBRUARY, 1872. 



29 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



BOSTON. NEW yOKK.l WASHINGTON. CHICAGO. | ST. LOUIS 



Last Qttaetee. . . 
New Moon 

FlEST QUAKTEK.. 

Full Moon 



IG 
24 



H. M. 

5 '26 M. 

9 8 E. 

1 40 M. 

6 12 M. 



H. M. 

5 14 M. 
8 56 E. 
1 28 M, 

6 M. 



H. M. 

5 2 M. 

8 44 E. 

1 16 M. 

5 48 M. 



H. M. 

4 20 
8 2 
34 

5 6 



M. 
E. 
M. 
M. 



IL M. 

4 9 M. 

7 51 E. 

23 M, 

4 56 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Moon Moon's 
South. Place. 



5 12 

6 
6 52 



21 



m 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun I Sun 
Rises. Sets. 

H. M. H. M 



7 14 
7 13 
7 12 



5 14 
5 15 
5 16 



Moon 
Rises. 

H. M. 



MOKN. 
31 

1 42 



High 
Water. 



4 20 

5 IS 

6 IC 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
OMo, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



7 11 

7 10 
7 9 



Sun 
Sets. 

H. M. 

5~T8 
5 19 
5 20 



Moon 
Rises. 



28 
38 



High 
Water. 

H. M. 



1 7 
1 59 
3 2 



Wasliingtcn, 
Md., Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun Sun 
Rises. Sets. 

H. M. H. M. 



7 

7 6 
7 5 



7 5 21 
5 23 

5 24 



Moon 
Rises. 



MORN. 
26 

1 34 



5) Sexagesima Sunday. 



2 m t 



Day's length at New York, lOh. 14m. 



41 Sunday 

5 [Monday 

6 Tuesday 
7 1 Wednesday 10 57 

Thursday* [111 59 

Friday 

Saturday 



EV. 
1 



51 



m 19 


7 11 


5 18 


2 56 


7 23 


7 


7 


5 21 


2 51 


4 8{ 


7 4 


5 25 


t 4 


7 10 


5 19 


4 9 


8 34 


7 


6 


5 22 


4 4 


5 19 


7 3 


5 26 


t 19 


7 9 


5 21 


5 20 


9 42 


7 


5 


5 23 


5 14 


6 28 


7 2 


5 27 


V3 4 


7 8 


5 22 


6 20 


10 44 


7 


4 


5 25 


6 15 


7 28 


7 1 


5 28 


TT& 19 


7 6 


5 23 


7 10 


11 37 


7 


3 


5 26 


7 5 


8 ]9i 


7 


5 29 


^ 3 


7 5 


5 24 


SETS. 


MOKN. 


7 


2 


5 27 


6ET8. 


9 13 6 59 


5 30 


^ 18 


7 4 


5 25 


7 30 


26 


7 


1 


5 28 


7 32 


9 58 


6 58 


5 32 



46 

58 

8 

9 





SETS. 

7 34 



6) Quinquagesima Sunday. 



$ in 



Day's length at New York, lOh. 30m. 



lljSunday 
12 Monday 
13i Tuesday 

1 4 Wednesday 

15 Thursday 
16j Friday 
17 Saturday 



2 41 


X 2 


7 2 


5 26 


8 42 


1 12 


7 


5 30 


8 43 


10 386 57 


5 33 


3 28 


X 15 


7 1 


5*28 


9 49 


1 56 


6 58 


5 31 


9 49 


11 20 


6 55 


5 34 


4 14 


X 29 


7 


5 29 


10 56 


2 38 


6 57 


5 32 


10 55 


MORN. 


6 54 


5 35 


4 59 


T 11 


6 59 


5 30 


MORN. 


3 21 


6 56 


5 34 


11 58 


6 


6 53 


5 36 


5 44 


T 24 


6 57 


5 32 


1 


4 5 


6 55 


5 35 


MORN. 


52 


6 52 


5 38 


6 31 


« 6 


6 56 


5 33 


1 3 


4 55 


,6 53 


5 36 


59 


1 42; 


6 51 


5 39 


7 18 


« 18 


6 54 


5 35 


2 5 


5 50 


6 52 


5 37 


2 


2 36; 


6 49 


5 40 



44 

48 
53 
55 



MORN. 
56 

1 55 



7) Quadragesima Sunday. 



U in n. Day's length at New York, lOh. 48m. 



18iSunday 
19 Monday 
20Tuesday 

21 Wednesda 

22 [Thursday 

23 Friday 

24 j Saturday 



I 8 7 


« 29| 


6 53 


5 36 


3 3 


1 8 57 


n 11! 


6 52 


5 38 


3 58 


' 9 47 


n 23 


6 50 


5 39 


4 49 


;i0 36 


© 5; 


6 48 


5 40 


5 35 


ill 24 


© 17 6 47 


5 42 


6 14 


MORN. 


23 30 6 45 


5 43 


RISES. 


10 


il 17j6 44 


5 45 


6 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

11 



51 5 
495 



48 
46 

45. 

44'.' 
42; 



39 
40 
41 
43 
44 
45 
46 



57 
52 
43 
29 
9 



3 32 



RISES. 

6 3 



6 48 

6 47 

6 46 

22|;6 44 

10 6 43 

49|,6 42 

8 29|l6 40 



5 41 


5 42 


5 44 


5 45 


5 46 


5 47 


5 48 



46 

37 

23 

3 

RISES. 

6 5 



8) Second Sunday in Lent. 



^ m # 



Day's length at New York, Uh. 7iu. 



25 Sunday 
26| Monday 

27 Tuesday 

28 Wednesday!! 

29 Thursday 



5(; 


^l 25j 


6 42 


5 46 


7 4 


Ey. 24 


!6 41 


5 48 


7 5 


9 11 


6 38 


5 49 


1 40 


TIE 8 


6 41 


5 47 


8 9 


1 2 


6 39 


5 49 


8 9 


9 48 


6 37 


5 51 


2 25 


m 21 


6 39 


5 49 


9 14 


1 41 


6 38 


5 50 


9 13 


10 25 


6 36 


5 52 


1 3 10 


-- 4: 


6 38 


5 50 


10 22 


2 21 


'6 37 


5 51 


10 20 


11 4 


6 34 


6 63 


3 57 


^ 18 


6 37 


5 51 


11 34 


3 4 


'e 36 


5 62 


11 31 


11 49 


6 34 


6 64 



7 7 

8 9 

9 12 

10 17 

11 27 




i3d Month. 



MARCH, 1872. 



31 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



BOSTON. 



NEW YORK. WASHINGTON. 



CHICAGO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



Last Qpaktee. . . 

Xew Moon 

First Quarter.. 

Full Moon 

Last Quarter. .. 



2 

9 

16 

24 

31 



H. M. 

2 45 E. 

8 9 M. 

9 41 E. 

8 .^9 E. 

9 48 E. 



H. M. 

2 33 E. 

T 57 M. 

9 29 E. 

8 47 E. 

9 36 E. 



H. M. 

2 21 E. 

7 45 M. 
9 17 E. 

8 35 E. 

9 24 E. 



U. M. 

1 39 E. 

7 3 M. 

8 35 E. 

7 53 E. 

8 42 E. 



U. M. 

1 28 E. 

6 52 M. 

8 24 E. 

7 42 E. 

8 31 E. 



Day of 

Week. 



Friday 
Saturday 



Moon 
South. 



4 48 

5 42 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



36 
35 



Sun 
Sets. 



5 51 
5 52 



Moon 
Rises. 



MORN. 

45 



High 
Water. 

M. M. 



3 54 

4 53 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



6 35 
6 34 



Sun 
Sets. 



5 53 
5 53 



Moon 
Rises. 



MORN. 

41 



High 
Waier. 



EV.40 
1 40 



Washington, 
Md.,Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



6 33 
6 32 



Sun 
Sets. 

H. M. 



Moon 
Rises. 



MORN. 

36 



9) Third Sunday in Lent. 



? in Y3. Day's length at New York,, llh. 22m. 



Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
9 i Saturday 



6 39 


m 29; i6 33 


5 53 


1 57 


6 1 


6 32 


5 54 


1 52 


2 47 


i6 30 


5 56 


7 40 


f 14; 


6 31 


5 54 


3 6 


7 15 


6 30 


5 55 


3 


4 


■6 29 


5 57 


8 42 


f 28 


6 30 


5 55 


4 8 


8 27 


6 29 


5 56 


4 2 


5 .12 


6 27 


5 57 


9 43 


V3 13 


6 28 


5 56 


5 1 


9 32 


6 27 


5 57 


4 5a 


6 18 


6 26 


5 58 


10 42 


V3 27 


6 26 


5 57 


5 45 


10 29 


6 25 


5 5^ 


5 40 


7 14 


6 24 


5 59 


11 37 


^ 12j 


6 25 


5 58 


6 20 


11 20 


6 24 


5 59 


6 16 


8 2 


6 23 


6 


EV. 28 


^ 26; 


6 23 


5 59 


sets. 


MORN. 


6 22 


6 


sets. 


8 46 


16 21. 


6. 1 



1 46 

2 54 

3 56 

4 50 

5 36 

6 13 
sets. 



10) Mid-Lent Sunday. 



5 in >^ . Day's length at NiBW York, llh. 41m. 



10| Sunday 

11 j Monday 

12 Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



1 17 


K 10 


6 21 


6 





7 29 


1 


6 20 


6 


1 


7 29 


9 29 


6 20 


6 2 


2 4 


K 23 


6 20 


6 


2 


8 37 


43 


6 19 


6 


2 


8 36 


10 10 


6 18 


6 3 


2 50 


T 6 


6 18 


6 


3 


9 44 


1 24 


6 17 


6 


3 


9 42 


10 47 


6 17 


6 4 


3 36 


T 19 


6 16 


6 


4 


10 48 


2 5 


6 16 


6 


4 


10 45 


11 28 


6 15 


6 5 


4 23 


« i 


6 14 


6 


5 


11 52 


2 46 


6 14 


6 


5 


11 48 


MORN. 


6 13 


6 6 


5 11 


« 14; 


6 13 


6 


6 


MORN. 


3 29 


6 12 


6 


6 


MORN. 


15 


6 12 


6 7 


6 


» 26 


6 11 


6 


7 


53 


4 19 


6 11 


6 


8 


48 


1 6; 


6 10 


6 8 



7 29 

8 34 

9 39 

10 41 

11 43 

MORN. 

43 



11) Fifth Sunday in Lent 



n in n. 



Day's length at New York, 12h. Om. 



Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
21 [Thursday 
22jFridav 
23! Saturday 



6 49 


n 7 


16 9 


6 9 


1 51 


5 13 


6 9 


6 9 


1 45 


1 59 


6 9 


6 9 


7 39 


n 19 


6 7 


6 10 


2 45 


6 11 


6 7 


6 10 


2 39 


2 57 


6 7 


6 10 


8 29 


© 1 


6 6 


6 11 


3 31 


7 11 


6 6 


6 11 


3 25 


3 56 


6 6 


6 11 


9 17 


© 13 


6 4 


6 12 


4 12 


8 12 


6 4 


6 12 


4 6 


4 56; 


6 4 


6 12 


10 4 


® 25 


'6 2 


6 13 


4 47 


9 5 


6 2 


6 13 


4 42 


5 50 6 3 


6 13 


10 50 


^. 8 


6 


6 14 


5 18 


9 53 


•6 1 


6 14 


5 14 


6 39, 


6 1 


6 14 


in 35 


^ 21 


|5 59 


6 15 


5 44 


10 37 


|5 59 


6 15 




7 22 


5 59 


6 15 



1 39 

2 33 

3 19 

4 1 
4 P 
5 
5 



11 
39 



12) Palm Sunday. 



^ in # 



Day's length at New York, 12h. 18m. 



Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
29 1 Friday 
30 Saturday 



MORN. 


m 4 


5 


20 


m 17 


5 


1 6 


^ 1 


.5 


1 54 


^ 14 


5 


2 44 


-^ 28 


5 


3 37 


TTl 12 


5 


4 34 


TTl 26 


n 



57 6 17 rises. 11 18 
55 6 18 7 3 11 53 
,53 6 19 8 12EV.34 
52 6 20 9 23 I 15 
50'6 21 10 36 1 59 
48 6 22 11 50 2 47 
46 6 23 MORN. 3 40 



58 6 
56*6 
5416 
526 
516 
496 
47 6 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
2l|ll 



7 2 

8 10 

9 20 
10 32 

45 



8 

8 38 

9 21 
10 2 

10 41 

11 29115 
ev.26h5 



58 6 
56|6 
5416 
53[6 
51 6 
.50 6 
48 6 



16 RISES 

17i 7 
18 8 
19| 9 
19:10 
20 11 
21 



2 

8 
17 
28 
40 



MORN. 



13) Easter Sunday. 



Jil in n. Day's length at New York, 12h. 37m. 



31|Sunday i| 5 34| t 10|!5 45|6 24| 1 0| 4 43|!5 46|6 23| 54| 1 30||5 4716 22| 



48 



TAIJR^S. 




4th Month. 



APRIL, 1872. 



30 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 


D. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASHINGTON. 


CHICAGO. 


ST. LOUIS. 






U. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


New Moon 


7 


7 48 E. 


7 36 E. 


9 24 E, 


8 42 E. 


8 31 E. 


FlKST QUAKTER 


15 


5 27 E. 


5 15 E. 


5 3 E. 


4 21 E. 


4 10 E. 


Full Moon 


23 


8 53 M. 


8 41 M. 


8 29 M. 


7 47 M. 


7 86 M. 


Last Quaetee 


30 


3 37 M. 


3 25 M. 


3 13 iL 


2 31 M. 


3 20 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



Monday 
Tuesday- 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



Moon 
South. 



6 35 

7 36 

8 33 

9 28 

10 19 

11 7 



Moon's 
Place. 



24 
9 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



V3 23 

^ 7 
^ 21 
X 5 



5 43 

5 41 
5 40 
5 38 
5 36 
5 35 



Sun 
Sets. 



6 25 
6 27 
6 28 
6 29 
6 30 
6 31 



Jloon 
Rises. 



High 
Water. 



10 53 



New York 
Conn., N. 
OMo, Ind 



City, PMla., 
Jersey, Pa., 
., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 



44 
42 
41 
39 
37 
36 



Sun 
Sets. 



6 24 
6 26 
6 27 
6 28 
6 29 
6 30 



Moon 
Rises. 



High 
Water. 

R. M. 



6 53 

7 37 



WasMngton, 
Md., Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



46 
44 
42 
41 
39 
37 



6 25 
6 26 
6 27 
6 28 



Moon 
Rises. 



5 13 



14) First Sunday after Easter. 



$ in 



Day's length at New York, 12h. 57m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 



111 54 
Iev.40 



13| Saturday 



18 
1 

14 
27 

9|'o 
221 io 

3! 15 



5 3316 

Is 31 6 

5 3016 

15 28 j 6 

266 

256 

236 



SETS. 

7 25 

8 32 

9 37 
37110 40 
38|ll 40 

39 MOKN. 



11 33 

MOKN. 
11 

51 

1 32 

2 15 
2 59 



34j6 
33 6 



31 



SETS. 



7 24 

8 29 

9 32 
10 35 



32 
33 
34 
35 
36^ 

37|MORN. 



11 35 



8 16 


5 36! 6 29 


8 56,;5 34 


6 30 


9 37 


5 33 


6 31 


10 17 


5 31 


6 32 


10 57 


5 30 


6 33 


11 43 


5 28 


6 34 


MORN. 


|5 27 


6 35 



7 22 

8 26 

9 28 

10 30 

11 29 

MORN. 



15) Second Sunday after Easter. 5 in T . 



Day's length at New York, 13h. 14m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 3i|n 

6 21 n 



21i6 
20,6 
186 
16 6 



15 
13 
12 



12i 9 26 



2416 
22'6 
20 6 



30 
19 
3 
42 
15 
42 
10 



33 c 
27 
25 
23 
20 
13 
2 



25j6 36 
24 6 37 
23 6 38 
21 6 39 
20 16 40 
186 41 
176 42 



23 
13 
57 
36 
11 
40 
8 



16) Third Sunday after Easter. U in n. Day's length at New York, 13h. 32m. 



21|Sunday 
22 Monday 
23 1 Tuesday 

24 j Wednesday 1 

25 Thursday ' 

26 Friday 

27 Saturday 



58|TIIi 12 



4.1 



MORN. 

35 

1 29 

2 26 1 n 

3 27 t 



m 26 

:C= 10 



m 



1016 
96 

76 
66 
46 
36 
16 



47 
48 
50 
51 
52 
53 
55 



4 36,10 1 

RISES. 1 10 45 

7 61 11 25 



8 21 

9 37 
10 51 



EV 



11 r,0 2 37 



13,6 
11 6 
106 

86 
76 
6'6 
416 



451 4 35 


6 47 


5 16 


6 42 


46 Ibises. 


7 29 


5 14 


6 43 


47 


7 4 


8 8 


5 13 


6 44 


48 


8 18 


8 53 


5 11 


6 45 


49 


9 32 


9 39 


5 10 


6 46 


50 


10 45 


10 26 


5 9 


6 47 


51 


11 .')3 


11 19 


5 8 


6 48 



4 35 

RISES. 

7 1 

8 14 

9 27 

10 39 

11 47 



17) Fourth Sunday after Easter. ^ in ^ 



Day's length at New York, 18h. 49m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 



4 29 

5 30 

6 29 




4 58 
4 57 



MORN. 
56 

1 44 



3 35 

4 39 

5 48 



316 
26 
5 06 



MORN. 
50 

1 89 



EV.21 

1 26 

2 34 



6 49 
6 50 
6 51 



MORN. 

44 
1 33 




5th Month. 






MAY, 1872. 




31 Days. 


MOOlf S PHASES. 


D. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASHINGTON. 


CHICAGO. 


ST. LOUIS. 


New Moon 

FlKST QUAUTEK 

Fdli, Moon 


7 
15 
22 
29 


H. M. 

8 35 M. 
11 21 M. 

6 24 E. 

9 29 M. 


H. M. 

8 23 M. 
11 9 M. 

6 12 E. 

9 17 M. 


H. M. 

8 11 M. 
10 57 M. 

6 E. 

9 5 M. 


H. M. 

7 29 M. 
10 15 M. 

5 18 E. 

8 23 M. 


u. u. 

7 18 M. 
10 4 M. 

5 7 E. 

8 12 M. 


Last Quartee 



Day of 

Week. 



Wednesday 
Thursday" 
Friday- 
Saturday 



Moon 
South. 



7 24 

8 15 

9 3 
9 50 



Moon's 
Place. 



Boston, New England, 
N.7. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



Sun 

Sets. 

H. M. 



Moon 
Rises. 

H. M. 



2 22 

2 53 

3 19 
3 45 



High 
Water. 



6 56| 

7 55 

8 50! 

9 39' 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 



4 59 
4 58 
4 56 
4 55 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 
Rises. 



2 18 

2 50 

3 18 
3 44 



High 
Water. 



3 41 

4 40 

5 35 

6 25 



Washington, 
Md., Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



Sun 
Sets. 



6 52 
6 53 
6 54 
6 55 



Moon 
Rises. 



2 13 

2 47 

3 16 

3 441 



18) Rogation Sunday. 



? m X. 



Day's length at New York, 14h. 6m. 



5 j Sunday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
AVednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
lljSaturdav 



10 35 


H 27' 


4 51 


7 4 


4 9 


10 23 


4 54 


7 





4 10 


7 9 


4 58 


6 56 


11 20 


T 10 


4 49 


7 5 


4 33 


11 4 


4 53 


7 


1 


4 35 


7 47 


4 57 


6 57 


EV. 6 


T 23 


4 48 


7 6 


SETS. 


11 43 


4 52 


7 


2 


SETS. 


8 25 


4 55 


6 58 


54 


» 5 


4 47 


7 7 


8 26 


MOEN. 


4 51 


7 


3 


8 22 


9 9 


4 54 


6 59 


1 43 


« 17 


4 46 


7 8 


9 29 


24 


4 49 


7 


4 


9 23 


9 51 


4 53 


7 


2 33 


« 30 


4 44 


7 9 


10 26 


1 5 


4 48 


7 


5 


10 20 


10 33 


4 52 


7 1 


3 23 


n li| 


4 43 


7 10 


11 19 


1 49 


4 47 


7 


6 


11 13 


11 15 


4 51 


7 2 



4 10 
4 37 

SETS 

8 17 

9 18 

10 14 

11 7 



19) Sixth Sunday after Easter. 



5 in T . Day's length at New York, 14h. 21m. 



12| Sunday 
13; Monday 

14 Tuesday 

15 j Wednesday 

16 Thursday 

17 Friday 
18i Saturday 



4 13 


n 23 


4 42 


7 11 


MOEN. 


2 33 


4 46 


7 7 


11 58 


MOEN. 


4 50 


7 2 


5 2 


2S 5 


4 41 


7 12 


4 


3 21 


4 45 


7 8 


MOEN. 


^i 


4 49 


7 3 


5 50 


© 17 


4 40 


7 13 


44 


4 9 


4 44 


7 9 


39 


55 


4 49 


7 4 


6 36 


© 29 


4 39 


7 14 


1 19 


5 2 


4 43 


7 10 


1 14 


1 48 


4 48 


7 5 


7 20 


SI 11 


4 38 


7 15 


1 48 


5 56 


4 42 


7 11 


1 45 


2 4li 


4 47 


7 6 


8 4 


9 24i 


4 37 


7 16 


2 14 


6 49 


4 41 


7 12 


2 11 


3 36 


4 46 


7 7 


8 49 


m 7 4 36 


7 17 


2 37 


7 42 


4 40 


7 13 


2 36 


4 27 


4 45 


7 8 



11 52 

MOEN. 

34 
1 10 

1 41 

2 9 
2 34 



20) Pentecost Sunday. 



U in n. 



Day's length at New York, 14h. 35m. 



191 Sunday 
20 Monday 
21 1 Tuesday 
22 Wednesday! 
23: Thursday 
24 1 Friday 
25; Saturday 



9 34 


m 20 


4 35 


7 18 


3 2 


8 34 


4 39 


7 14 


3 .2 


5 19 


4 44 


7 9 


10 23 


^ 4 


4 34 


7 19 


3 25 


9 22 


4 39 


7 15 


3 27 


6 8 


4 44 


7 10 


11 15 


^ 18 


4 33 


7 20 


3 52 


10 11 


4 38 


7 16 


3 54 


6 57| 


4 43 


7 10 


MOEN. 


TTl 3 


4 32 


7 21 


ETSES. 


11 


4 37 


7 17 


EISES. 


7 43 


4 42 


7 111 


12 


TTl 17 


4 31 


7 22 


8 33 


11 48 


4 36 


7 18 


8 27 


8 31 


4 41 


7 12 


1 13 


# 2 


4 31 


7 23 


9 46 


Ey.39 


4 36 


7 19 


9 40 


9 25 


4 41 


7 13 


2 17 


^ 17 


4 30 


7 24 


10 50 


1 35 


4 35 


7 20 


10 44 


10 20; 


4 40 


7 14 



3 2 

3 28 
3 57 

USES. 

8 22 

9 33 
10 37 



26 
27 

28 Tuesday 

29 Wednesday 

30 Thursday 
31 1 Friday 



21) Trinity Sunday, 
Sunday 
Monday 



'^ m t 



Day's length at New York, 14h. 46m. 



3 21 


V3 1 


4 29 


7 25 


11 42 


2 32 


4 34 


7 20 


U 37 


4 22 


V3 16 


4 29 


7 26 


MOEN. 


3 28 


4 34 


7 21 


MOEN. 


5 20 


V3 30 


4 28 


7 27 


24 


4 29 


4 33 


7 22 


20 


6 13 


.T 14 


4 27 


7 28 


58 


5 29 


4 32 


7 23 


54 


7 2 


^ 28 


4 27 


7 28 


1 25 


6 27 


14 32 


7 23 


1 23 


7 48 


K 11 


4 26 


7 29 


1 50 


7 23i4 31 


7 24 


1 49 



11 134 
Ey.l4|'4 

1 1514 

2 15 4 

3 18 4 

4 8l;4 



39 


7 14 


39 


7 15 


38 


7 16 


38 


7 17 


37 


7 17 


37 


7 18 



11 31 

MOEN. 

15 

51 

1 21 

1 48 




6th Month. 






JUNE, 1872. 




30^ Days. 


MOON'S PHASES. 


D. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK.; WASHINGTON. 


CHICAGO. 


ST. LOUIS. 


New Moon 

First Quarter 

Full Moon 

Last Quarter 


5 
14 

21 

27 


H. M. 

10 39 E. 
2 35 M. 
2 14 M. 
4 43 E. 


H. M. 

10 27 E. 
2 23 M. 
2 2 M. 
4 31 E. 


H. M. 

10 15 E. 
2 11 M. 
1 50 M. 
4 19 E. 


H. M. 

9 33 E. 
1 29 M. 
1 8 M. 

3 37 E. 


11. M. 

9 22 R 
1 18 M. 
57 M. 

3 26 E. 



Day of 
Week. 



Saturday 



Moon 
South. 



Aloon'a 
Place. 



8 33 ^ 24 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sua 
Rises. 

H. M. 



4 25 



Sua 
Sets. 



7 30 



Moou 
Rises. 



2 13 



High 
Water. 



8 16 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
OMo, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



Sun 
Seta. 

H. M. 



Moon 
Rises. 



4 3l!7 24 2 14 5 



High 
Water. 
R. M. 



Washington, 
Md.,Va.,Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



4 36 7 19 2 14 



Moon 
Rises. 



22) First Sunday after Trinity. 



$ in « 



Day's length at New York, 14h. 55m. 



2 Sunday 

3 Monday 

4 Tuesday 
5 1 Wednesday 



Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



9 18 


T 7, 


4 25 


7 30 


2 37 


10 3 


T 19 


4 25 


7 31 


3 2 


10 49 


« 2 


4 24 


7 32 


3 30 


11 37 


« 14 


4 24 


7 32 


SETS. 


EV.27 


« 26 


4 24 


7 33 


8 18 


1 17 


n 8 


4 23 


7 33 


9 13 


2 8 


n 20 


4 23 


7 34 


10 2 



9 6!|4 

9 52:4 

10 36 4 

11 20' ,4 

12 0J4 

MORN. 4 
434 



30 


7 25 


2 39 


5 51i!4 36 


7 19 


30 


7 26 


3 


6 38 


4 36 


7 20 


30 


7 26 


3 34 


7 21 


14 35 


7 21 


29 


7 27 


sets. 


8 2 


4 35 


7 21 


29 


7 28 


8 12 


8 45i;4 35 


7 22 


29 


7 28 


9 7 


9 29; 4 34 


7 23 


29 


7 29 


9 56 


10 12 


4 34 


7 23 



2 40 

3 8 
3 38 

BETS. 

8 6 

9 1 
9 49 



23) Second Sunday after Trinity. 5 in b . 



Day's length at New York, 15h. 2m. 



9 Sunday 

10 Monday 

11 [Tuesday 

12 j Wednesday 
13|Thursday 
14|Friday 

15 Saturday 



2 57 


S 2 


3 45 


© 13 


4 31 


® 25 


5 15 


^ 7 


5 58 


S}. 20 


6 41 


m 2 


7 25 


m 15 



23|7 35J10 43 
23 7 36|ll 19 

22|7 36 11 50 
22 7 37 MORN. 
22 7 371 16 



22 7 38 



40 



22 7 38 1 2 



27 


4 28 


7 30 


10 38 


10 52 


10 


j4 28 


7 30 


11 14 


11 37 


53 


4 28 


7 31 


11 46 


morn. 


37 


4 28 


7 31 


morn. 


23 


23 


4 28 


7 32 


13 


1 10 


11 


:4 28 


7 32 


38 


1 57 


3 


'4 28 


7 32 


1 2 


2 49 




24) Third Sunday after Trinity. It in u. 



Day's length at 



Sunday i 8 11 

Monday 9 

Tuesday [ d M :C= 
Wednesday 10 53 n 

Thursday 11 57 
Friday 
Saturday 



morn. 
1 2 



m. 28:14 22,7 
^ 12|4 22!7 

26' 4 22I7 

1114 

26 '4 

ll|4 

26 4 



381 1 26 
39 1 51 
39 2 17 



22,7 
23 7 
23:7 

237 



2 51 



RISES, 

8 32 11 

9 33 Ev, 



28 1 7 33 
28 7 33 
28 7 33 

28 7 34 

29 7 34 
29,7 34 
29 7 34 



25) Fourth Sunday after Trinity. 



^^ in f 



Day's length at New York, 15h. 



23 1 Sunday 
|24 Monday 



Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 



29! Saturday 



17[T 



11 
2() 
10 
24 

8 
21 

4 



23 7 
23 7 



40 10 20 

40 10 57 

41 11 29 



25 7 
2517 



11 54 

MOBN. 
19 

45 



29 1 7 
29,7 
307 
30 7 
307 
2917 
2917 



34ilO 16 
35 1 10 54 
35 11 26 



11 53 

MOSN. 

19 
46 



10 12 

11 4 
11 58 

EV.51 

1 44 

2 37 

3 21 



29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 



10 10 

10 .50 

11 24 

11 52: 

MORN. I 

19, 

47i 



26) Fifth Sunday after Trinity. T^ in £p. 



Day's length at New York, 15h. 6m. 



30|Sunday || 8 2|T 16||4 26|7 40| 1 7| 7 40|14 29|7 35| 1 9| 4 25|i4 37|7 29| 1 12 




7th Month. JULY, 1872. 31 Days-j 


MOON'S PHASES. D. | BOSTON. | NEW YORK.] WASHING-TON. 


CHICAGO. 


ST. LOUIS. 1 


1 U. M. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


New Moon 


5 
3 


1 41 E. 
3 4 E. 


1 29 E. 

2 52 E. 


1 17 E. 

2 40 E. 


35 E. 

1 58 E. 


24 E. 

1 47 E. 


FiKST Quarter 1 


Full Moon 2 




7 


9 9 M. 
2 35 M. 


8 57 M. 
2 23 M. 


8 45 M. 
2 11 M. 


8 3 M. 
1 29 M. 


7 52 M. 
1 18 M. 


Last Quarter 2 








Boston, New England, New York City, Phila ,| 


Washington, 


D. 


Day of 
Week. 




N.Y. State, Michigan, 


Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 


Md., Va., Ky., 


of 
M. 




Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 


Ohio, Ind., and 111. 


Mo., and Cal. 


Moon 
South. 


Moon's 


Sun 1 Sun 
Rises. Sets. 


Moon 
Rises. 


High 
Water. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 
Rises. 


High 
Water. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 1 
Rises. 








R. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


Monday 


8 47 


T 29 


4 26 


7 40 


1 33 


8 32 


|4 32 


7 35 


1 37 


5 17 


4 38 


7 29 


1 41 


2 


Tuesday 


9 34 


« 11 


4 26 


7 40 


2 4 


9 22 


4 32 


7 35 


2 8 


6 8 


4 38 


7 29 


2 13 


3 


Wednesday 


10 23 


« 23 


4 27 


7 40 


2 39 


10 11 


4 33 


7 34 


2 44 


6 57 


4 39 


7 29 


2 50 


4 


Thursday 


11 13 


n 7 


4 28 


7 40 


3 20 


10 58 


4 33 


7 34 


3 26 


7 41 


4 39 


7 28 


3 32 


5 


Friday ev. 3 


n 17 


4 29 


7 39 


SETS. 


11 41 


4 34 


7 34 


SETS. 


8 23 


4 40 


7 28 


SETS. 


6 


Saturday 53 


n 29 


4 29 


7 39 


8 42 


MORN. 


4 35 


7 34 


8 37 


9 8 


4 41 


7 28 


8 31 


27) Sixth Sunday after Trinity. ? in n. Day's length at New York, 14h. 58m. j 


7 


Sunday 


1 41 


© lOj 


4 30 


7 39 


9 19 


21,4 35 


7 33 


9 14 


9 49 


4 41 


7 28 


9 9 


8 


Monday 


2 28 


® 22 


4 30 


7 38 


9 52 


1 3 


4 36 


7 33 


9 48 


10 28 


4 42 


7 27 


9 43 


9 


Tuesday 


3 13 


^, 4 


4 31 


7 38 


10 20 


1 44 


4 87 


7 33 


10 17 


11 7 


4 42 


7 27 


10 13 


10 


Wednesday 


3 56 


^, 16 


4 32 


7 38 


10 44 


2 24 


4 37 


7 32 


10 42 


11 48 


4 43 


7 27 


10 40 


11 


Thursday 


4 38 


^, 29 


4 33 


7 37 


11 7 


3 3 


4 38 


7 32 


11 6 


MORN. 


4 44 


7 26 


11 5 


12 


Friday 


5 20 


TIE 11 


4 33 


7 37 


11 30 


3 44 


4 39 


7 31 


11 30 


30 


4 44 


7 26 


11 30 


13 


Saturday 


6 4 


m 24 


4 34 


7 36 


11 .53 


4 28 


4 39 


7 31 


11 54 


1 16 


4 45 


7 26 


11 55 


28) Seventh Sunday after Trinity. 5 in n. . Day's length at New York, 14h. 50m. 


14 Sunday 


6 50=£i 7 


4 35 


7 36 


morn. 


5 17 


4 40 


7 30 


MORN. 


2 3 |4 46 7 25 


MORN. 


15 


Monday 


7 40 


:C= 21 


4 36 


7 35 


17 


6 12 


4 41 


7 30 


20 


2 58 4 46 7 24 


23 


16 


Tuesday 


8 35 


m 5 


4 37 


7 34 


47 


7 15 


4 42 


7 29 


51 


4 0| 4 47 7 24 


55 


17 


Wednesday 


9 35 


m 19 


4 37 


7 34 


1 24 


8 18 


4 43 


7 29 


1 29 


5 2 4 48 7 23 


1 24 


18 


Thursday 


10 40 


t 4 


4 38 


7 33 


2 10 


9 23 


4 44 


7 28 


2 16 


6 9 


4 49 7 23 


2 22 


19 


Friday 


11 46 


^ 19 


4 39 


7 32 


RISES. 


10 27 


4 44 


7 27 


RISES. 


7 13 


4 50 7 22 


RISES. 


20 


Saturday 


morn. 


V3 6 


4 40 


7 31 


8 10 


11 26 


4 45 


7 26 


8 4 


8 9 


4 51 7 21 


7 58 


29) Eighth Sunday after Trinity. i; in ®. Day's length at New York, 14h. 4 


Om. 


21 Sunday 


51 


V3 20j4 41 


7 30 


8 53 


EV.19|!4 46 


7 26 


8 48 


9 6! 4 52 


7 21 


8 44 


22 Monday 


1 51 


^ 5 k 42 


7 30 


9 26 


1 13 4 47 


7 25 


9 23 


9 58} 4 52 
10 44 14 53 


7 20 


9 20 


23 j Tuesday 


2 47 


^ 19 


4 43 


7 29 


9 56 


2 2 4 48 


7 24 


9 54 


7 19 


9 52 


24 1 Wednesday 


i 3 39 


K 4 


4 44 


7 28 


10 21 


2 47 4 48 


7 23!l0 20 


11 31 


4 54 


7 18 


10 20 


25 


Thursday 


4 27 


^ 17 


4 45 


7 27 


10 46 


3 33 4 49 


7 23'10 46 


Ey.l9 


4 55 


7 18 


10 47 


26 


Friday 


5 13 


T 1 


4 46 


7 26 


11 10 


4 2l|4 50 


7 22 11 12 


1 8 


4 56 


7 17 


11 14 


27 


Saturday 


5 59 


T 13 


4 47 


7 25 


11 27 


5 12! '4 51 


7 21 'U 30 


1 57 


4 57 


7 16 


11 33 


30) Ninth Sunday after Trinity. ^ in ^ . Day's length at New York, 14h. 28m. 


28 


Sunday 


6 45|T 26 


4 48 


7 24 


morn. 


6 7 


4 52 


7 20 


MORN. 


2 53 


4 58 


7 15 


MORN. 


29 


Monday 


7 32 


» 8 


4 49 


7 23 


6 


7 4 


4 53 


7 19 


11 


3 49 


4 58 


7 14 


15 


30 Tuesday 


8 20 


« 20 


4 50 


7 22 


39 


8 


4 54 


7 18 


44 


4 45 


4 59 


7 13 


50 


31 Wednesday 


9 9 


n 2 


4 51 


7 21 


1 18 


8 57 


4 55 


7 17 


1 24 


5 41 


4 59|7 12 


1 30| 



- viKco. 




8th Month. AUGUST, 1872. 31 Days.i 


MOON'S PHASES. 1 D. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. WASHING-TON.] CHICAGO, i ST. LOUIS. | 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H* 3I* XI. Ja» 




4 
12 


5 1 M. 

ISM. 


4 49 M. 
56 M. 


4 37 M. 
44 M, 


3 55 M. 3 44 M. 
2 M. *11 51 E. 


FlEST QCAKTEE 




18 
25 


4 9 E. 
3 51 E. 


3 57 E. 
3 39 E. 


3 45 E. 3 3 E. i 2 52 E. 1 

3 27 E. 2 45 E. I 2 34 E. 1 


Last Quaetee 








Boston, New England, 


New York City, Phila., 


Washington, 


T). 






N.Y. State, Michigan, 


Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 


Md.,Va., Ky., 


of 


Day of 
Week. 




Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 


Ohio, Ind., and 111. 


Mo., and Cal. 








Moon High ] 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon Hi^h 


Sun 


Sun 1 Moon | 






Moon 


Moon's 


Rises. Sets. 


Rises. 


Water. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Waaler. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 










H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


Thursday 


10 


n 14 


4 52 


7 20 


2 4 


9 49 


4 56 


7 16 


2 10 


6 35 


5 07 11 


2 16 


2 


Friday 


10 50 


n 26 


4 53 


7 18 


2 55 


10 37 


4 57 


7 14 


3 2 


7 22 


5 117 10 


3 8 


3 


Saturday 


11 39 


© 7 


4 54 7 17 


3 49 


11 19 


4 58 


7 13 


3 55 8 2 


5 2 7 9 4 1} 


31) Tenth Sunday after Trinity. $ in ©. Day's length at New York, 14ti. 13m. 


4 


Sunday Ey. 26 


G 19, 


4 55 7 16 


SETS. 


11 59 


4 59 


7 12 SETS. 


8 44 


5 3 


7 8 


SETS. 


5 


Monday 


1 11 


^, 1 


4 56 7 15 


8 23 


MOEN. 


5 


7 11 


8 20 


9 23, 


5 4 


7 7 


8 16 


6 


Tuesday 


1 55 


^ 13| 


4 57 7 14 


8 49 


37 


5 1 


7 10 


8 46 


10 11 


5 5 


7 6 


8 44 


7 


Wednesday 


2 37 


^ 26, 


4 58 


7 12 


9 11 


1 15 


5 2 


7 9 


9 10 


10 37 


5 6 


7 5 


9 9 


8 


Thursday 


3 19 


m 8 


4 59 


7 11 


9 34 


1 53 


5 3 


7 7 


9 33 


11 13 


5 6 


7 4 


9 33 


9 


Friday 


4 2 


Tm 21 5 


7 10 


9 56 


2 30 


5 4 


7 6 


9 57 


11 54 


5 7 


7 2 9 581 


10 


Saturday 


4 46 


-= 35 17 8 


10 20 


3 9 


5 5 


7 5 


la 22 MOEN. 1 


5 87 IjlO 241 


32) Eleventh Sunday after Trinity. 3 in n. Day's length at New York, 13h. 58m. | 


11 


Sunday 


5 33 rCi: 17| 


5 2 


7 7 


10 47 


3 52 


5 6 


7 4 


10 50 


38 5 9,7 


10 54 


12 


Monday 


6 24'-= 30 


5 3 


7 6 


11 19 


4 42 


5 7 


7 2 


11 24 


1 29 5 10 


6 59 


11 28 


13 


Tuesday 


7 20 TTl 14 


5 4 


7 4 


12- 


5 43 


5 8 


7 1 


MOEN. 


2 29 j5 11 


6 58 


MOBN. 


U 


Wednesday 


8 21 TTl 28 


5 5 


7 3 


MOEN. 


6 48 


5 9 


7 


5 


3 35 


15 12 


6 56 


11 


15 


Thursday 


9 25 ^ 13 


5 6 


7 1 


52 


8 1 


5 10 


6 58 


58 


4 47 


5 13 


6 54 


1 5 


16 


Friday 


tlO 29 t 28 


5 7 


7 


1 56 


9 13 


5 11 


6 57 


2 2 


5 59 


5 14 


6 53 


2 9 


17 


Saturday 


'll .321 V3 I3'l5 8 


6 58 


3 lOllO 17 


!5 12!6 .55 


3 16 


7 3 5 15 6 52 


3 21 


33) Twelfth Sunday after Trinity. U in e. Day's length at New York, 13h. 41m. 


18 


Sunday 


MOEN. 


Y3 28, 


5 10 


6 57 


EISE8. ill 15 


5 13 


6 54 


EISES. 


7 57i5 16 6 51 


RISES. 


19 


Monday 


31 


^13 


5 11 


6 55 


7 53 EV. 4 


5 14 


6 53 


7 51 


8 49 5 1716 50 


7 48 


20 


Tuesday 


1 25 


;^ 28; 


5 12 


6 54 


8 21 


49 


5 15 


6 51 


8 20 


9 35 J5 17 6 48 


8 19 


21 


Wednesday 


2 16 


X 12 


5 13 


6 52 


8 47 


1 34 


5 16 


6 50 


8 47 


10 19 5 18|6 47 


8 48 


22 


Thursday 


3 5 


X 2615 14 


6 51 


9 11 


2 18 


5 17 


6 48 


9 13 


11 


5 19,6 45 


9 15 


23 


Friday 


3 52 


T 9,5 15 


6 49 


9 37 


2 59 


5 17 


6 47 


9 40 


11 44 


5 20 6 44 


9 48 


24 


Saturday 


4 39 


T 22 5 16 


6 48 


10 6 


3 45 '5 18 


6 45 


10 10 


EV.31 


5 21 6 43 


10 15 


34) Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity. V in # . Day's length at New York, 13h. 26m. | 


25 


Sunday 


5 27 


» 5 


5 17 


6 46 


10 38i 4 36 


5 19 6 44 


10 43 


1 23 5 22,6 4l|10 48| 


2G 


Monday 


6 15 


« 17 


5 18 


6 44 


11 17 


5 13 


5 20 6 42 


11 23 


2 17 5 23 


6 40 11 28 


27 


Tuesday 


7 5 


» 29 


5 19 


6 43 


11 .59 


6 30 


5 216 41 


MOEN. 


3 1715 24 


6 38 HORN. 


28 


Wednesday 


7 55 


n 11 


5 20 


6 41 


MOBV. 


7 33 


5 22 6 39 


5 


4 17 |5 25 


6 37 


11 


29 


Thursday 


8 45 


n 22 


5 21 


6 39 


49 


8 30 


5 23 


6 37 


55 


5 15 


5 26 


6 35 


1 1 


30 


Friday 


9 35 


© 4 


5 22 


6 38 


1 44! 9 23 


5 24 


6 36 


1 50 


6 9 


5 2616 34 


1 56 


31 


Saturday 


10 23 


© 16 


6 23 


G 36 


2 42[10 11 


5 25 


6 34 


2 47 


6 57:5 2716 32 


2 53 



11th. 




9th Month. 




SEPTEMBER, 1872. 




30 Days. 


MOON'S PHASES. 


D. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASHINGTON. 


CHICAGO. 


ST. LOUIS. 


New Moon 

FiKST Quarter 

Fdli. Moon 

Last Quarter 


2 
10 
16 
24 


U. M. 

S 9 E. 

9 19 M. 

*0 20 M. 

8 37 M. 


H. M. 

7 57 E. 
9 7 M. 

*0 8 M. 

8 25 M. 


H. M. 

7 45 E. 

8 55 M. 
11 56 E. 

8 13 M. 


U. M. 

7 3 E. 

8 13 M. 
11 14 E. 

7 31 M. 


U. M. 

6 52 E. 

8 2 M. 
11 3 E, 

7 20 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



Moon Moon': 
South. Place. 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sua 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 

Rises. 



High 
Water. 

H. M. 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 
Rises. 



High 
Water. 



Washington, 
Md.,Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sua 
Rises. 



Suii 
Sets. 



Moon 
Rises. 



35) Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity. ? in .^. Day's length at New York, 13h. 7m. 



Sunday 


11 9 


© 28j 


5 24 


6 35 


3 43 


10 54 


5 26 


6 33 


3 48 


7 40 


5 28 


6 311 


Monday 


11 53 


^, io| 


5 26 


6 83 


sets. 


11 31 


5 27 


6 31 


bets. 


8 13 


5 29 


6 29' 


Tuesday 


EV.36 


S). 23 


5 27 


6 31 


7 16 


MORN. 


5 28 


6 29 


7 15 


8 54 


5 30 


6 28 


Wednesday 


1 18 


m 5 


5 28 


6 29 


7 38 


9 


5 29 


6 28 


7 37 


9 30 


5 31 


6 26 


Thursday 


2 1 


m 18 


5 29 


6 28 


8 1 


44 


5 30 


6 26 


8 2 


10 7 


5 32 


6 25 


Friday 


2 45 


m 30 


5 30 


6 26 


8 24 


1 21 


5 31 


6 25 


8 26 


10 42 


5 33 


6 23 


Saturday 


3 30 


-= 13 


5 31 


6 24 


8 49 


2 


5 32 


6 23 


8 52 


11 22 


5 34 


6 22 



3 52 



13 

37 

3 

28 
55 



36) Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity. 5 in 23. Day's length at New York, 12h. 48m. 



8 j Sunday 

9 j Monday 
10 Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



4 20 


:^ 271 


5 32 


6 22 


9 20 


2 40 


5 33 


6 21 


9 24 


MORN. 


5 35 


6 211 


5 13 


TTL 10 


5 33 


6 21 


9 56 


3 27 


5 34 


6 20 


10 2 


12 


5 35 6 20 


6 10 


TTl 24 


5 34 


6 19 


10 43 


4 21 


5 35 


6 18 


10 49 


1 8 


5 36 6 18 


7 11 


f 8 


5 35 


6 17 


11 39 


5 26 


5 36 


6 16 


11 45 


2 12 


5 37 


6 17 


8 13 


f 22 


5 36 


6 15 


MORN. 


6 39 


5 37 


6 15 


MORN. 


3 25 


5 38 


6 15 


9 15 


Y3 7 


5 37 


6 14 


48 


7 53 


5 38 


6 13 


54 


4 38 


5 39 


6 14 


|lO 14 


V3 22{ 


5 38 


6 12 


2 4 


9 3 


5 39 


6 11 


2 9 


5 48 


5 40 


6 12 



MORN 

1 

2 14 



37) Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity. U in 53. Day's length ?.t New York, 12h 29m. 



15 Sunday 
161 Monday 
17| Tuesday 

18 [Wednesday 

19 Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



11 10 


ANV '7i 


5 39:6 10 


3 23 


10 2 


5 40 


6 9 


3 26 


6 48||5 41 


6 10 


MORN. 


^ 21 


5 40 6 8 


rises. 


10 55 


5 41 


6 8 


rises. 


7 39 ;5 42 


6 9 


2 


K 6 


5 41 


6 7 


6 44 


11 40 


5 42 


6 6 


6 44 


8 22 


i5 43 


6 7 


52 


K 20 


5 43 


6 5 


7 10 


EV.20 


5 43 


6 4 


7 11 


9 7 


5 44 


6 6 


1 41 


T 4 


5 44 


6 3 


7 37 


1 3 


5 44 


6 3 


7 39 


9 49 


5 44 


6 4 


2 29 


T 17 


5 45 6 1 


8 3 


1 45 


5 45 


6 1 


8 7 


10 29 


5 45 


6 2 


3 17 


T 30 


5 46 6 


8 36 


2 29 


:5 46 


5 59 


8 41 


11 11 


5 46 


6 1 



3 30 
rises. 

6 43 

7 12 

7 41 

8 11 
8 45 



38) Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity. ^ in # . Day's length at New York, 12h. 11m. 



22; Sunday 
23 Monday 



Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 


7 


4 


57 


5 


48 


6 


39 


7 


29 


8 


18 


9 


4 



<TS 2 



13115 47 

2515 48 

7|l5 49 

19!5 .50 

Ills 51 5 51 

52|5 49 

53 5 47 



5 58 
5 56 
5 54 
5 53 



13;5 



9 11 
9 53 

10 41 

11 34 

MORN. 

32 
1 30 



8 51 



4715 
48 5 



5 49 
5 50 
5 51 



52 5 

53^5 



58 
56 
54 
53 

52 MORN 

50 1 38 
48! 1 .3; 



9 17 
.9 .59 

10 47 

11 40 



11 59 


5 47 


5 59 


EV.50 


5 48 


5 58 


1 46 


5 49 


5 56 


2 47 


5 50 


5 54 


3 46 


5 51 


5 53 


4 43 


5 52 


5 51 


5 36' 


5 53 


5 50 



9 22 
10 6 

10 54 

11 47 

MORN. 

43 
1 40 



39) Eighteenth Sunday after Trinity. M in ©. Day's length at New York, llh. 52m. 



Sunday 
Monday 



9 


49 


^. 


71 


.5 


54 


5 


46 


2 


33 


9 


38 


''* 


5415 


46 


2 


37 


6 


24 


10 


33 


^ 


19 


5 


56 


5 


44 


3 


36 


10 


21 


15 


54|5 


44 


3 


39 


7 


7 



5 54 
5 55 



5 48 
5 46 



2 41 

3 41 



17th. 



SCORPIO. 




lOth Month. 



OCTOBER, 1872. 



31 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



BOSTON, NEW YORK. WASHINGTON.! CHICAGO. 



New Moox 2 

First Quarter 9 

Full Moon 16 

Last Quarter 24 

New Moon I 31 



10 46 M. 

4 20 E. 

10 50 M. 

4 9 M. 



II. M. 

10 34 M 

4 8 E. 

10 38 M 

3 57 M 



II. 



M. 



10 22 M. 

3 56 E. 

10 26 M. 

3 45 M. 



40 M. 

14 E. 

44 M. 

3 M. 



11 38 E. 



ST. LOUIS. 



II. 

9 

3 

9 

2 52 M. 
11 27 E. 



M. 

29 M. 

3 E. 

33 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



jTuesday 
i Wednesday 
jThuv.sday 
I Friday 
Saturday 



Boston, New Inglaud, 
N.T. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Moon 
South. 



11 16 
11 59 
EV.42 

1 28 

2 17 



Moon's 
Place. 



m 27 

:C. 10 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



57 

58 
59 



Sun 
Sets. 

H. M. 



6 
24!6 



05 

15 



42 
40 
39 
37 
35 



Moon 
Rises. 



4 39 

SETS. 

6 27 

6 52 

7 21 



High 
Water. 



11 1 

11 37 

MORX. 

12 



New York City, Phila , 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



56 !5 43 

5715 41 

58 5 

59 5 38 
5 36 



Jloon j High 
Rises. Water. 



4 40 

SETS. 

9 6 29 
6 55 



7 44 

8 19 

8 58 

9 38 
7 25 10 20 



Washington, 
Md., Va., Ky., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 



o 55 5 43 
5 56 15 42 
5 575 40 
5 58 15 39 
o 59 5 37 



Moon 
Rises. 



4 42 

SETS. 

6 31 

6 58 

7 29 



40) Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity. ? in =^. Day's length at New York, llh. Sim. 



6 [Sunday 

7 j Monday 

8 jTuesday 

9 [Wednesday' 
10 Thursday 
n Friday 
1 2 Saturday 



3 9 


H 7 


6 


2 


5 33 


7 56 


1 35 


16 


1 


5 35 


8 1 


11 3 6 





5 35 


4 5 


TTl 21 


6 


3 


5 32 


8 38 


2 20 


r 


2 


5 33 


8 44 


11 57 


6 


1 


5 34 


5 4 


t 5 


6 


4 


5 30 


9 32 


3 12 


6 


3 


5 31 


9 38 


MORN. 


1^ 


2 


5 32 


6 5 


# 19 


6 


6 


5 28 


10 35 4 10 


6 


4 


5 30 


10 41 


57 


6 


3 


5 31 


7 6 


V3 3 


6 


7 


5 27 


11 48 5 18 


6 


5 


5 28 


U 53 


2 4|6 


4 


5 29 


8 4 


V3 17 


,6 


8 


5 25 


MORN. 


G 31 16 


7 


5 27 


MORN. 


3 18 6 


5 


5 28 


8 59 


^ 2'6 


9 


5 23 


1 4 


7 42 6 


8 


5 25 


1 8 


4 27ll6 


c 


5 26 



8 6 

8 50 

9 45 

10 48 

11 59 

MORN. 

1 13 



41) Twentieth Sunday after Trinity 
9"51 



S in ^. 



13jSunday 
14 j Monday 
15!Tuesday 
IGj Wednesday 
KJThursday 
18 Friday 
19| Saturday 



10 41 
U 29 

MORN. 
17 

1 6 
1 56 



X 





K 


15 


T 


28 


T 


12 


T 


25 


» 


8 



16; 6 10 o 
6 11 



,6 13 
6 14 
6 15 
6 16 
6 17 



221 2 20 

20! 3 35 

4 49 



5 19 
5 17 
5 15 
5 14 
5 12 



RISES. 



Day's length at New York, llh. 14m 

6~ 9:5 23 2 23 
6 10 5 22 3 36 
6 11 5 20 4 49 



8 461 

9 40 { 

10 27|| 

11 1216 12!5 



6 211 .53 

6 32'ev.34 

7 111 I 16|6 1515 



13:5 
14 5 



RISES. 

6 5 

6 36 

7 16 



5 31!|6 7 

6 26 6 8 

7 13:6 9 
7 55 6 10 

6 11 



8 36' 

9 21 
10 2 



6 12 



5 25 
5 23 
5 22 
5 21 
5 19 
5 18 



6 13 5 16 



2 26 

3 38 

4 50 

RISES. 

6 8 

6 41 

7 22 



42) Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity, n in Q,. Day's length at New York, lOh. 57m. 



20! Sunday 
21 'Monday 
22, Tuesday 
23 Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 



26 Saturday 



2 


46 


3 


38 


4 


30 


5 


21 


6 


11 


6 


58 


7 


44| 



21j6 18,5 
3 6 20 5 



n 1516 21 



2716 22 
9 ,f> 23 5 

21 6 245 
3 '6 26 5 



5 6 



7 45 

8 32 

9 23 
10 20 

5|ll 19 

3 MOUN. 

2 20 



6 16 5 
■6 18 5 
6 19i5 
,6 20 5 
6 21 5 

;.! 22 . 

|6 23 ;5 



13 7 51 


10 43: 


12j 8 38 11 30 


10 9 29,EV.22 


9 10 26 


1 16; 


7 11 24 


2 12 


6 MORN. 


3 9 


4| 25 


4 4! 



1415 15 
15 5 14 
6 16 5*13 

18 5 11 

19 5 lOjU 29 

20 5 9 MORN. 

215 81 29 



7 57 

8 44 

9 35 
10 32 



43) Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity 

6\>7|5 ' 



27 Sunday 

28 Monday 
29Tuesdiiv 



30 

31 



Wednesday 
Thursday 



8 27 

9 10 
9 53 

10 36 



^ 15 
TTR 27 

m 10 

TTJi 23 



1 1 22 ^ 6 



28 4 .59 

29; 4 57 

6 31 4 57 

6 32 4 55 



? in t . 
8 10 

8 58 

9 42 
10 24 



Day's length at New York, lOh. 89m. 



1 22 

2 24 

3 20 

4 31 

5 .39111 5 



6 24 
() 26 
6 27 
6 28 
6 29 



1 25 

2 26 

3 21 

4 31 

5 37 



4 .54 

5 43 

6 28 



6 22 
6 23 
(5 24 
6 25 
6 26 



1 28 

2 28 

3 22 

4 30 

5 35 



SAGBTTAi^US. 




nth Month. 



NOVEMBER, 1872. 



30 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES, 



D. i BOSTON. NEW YORE.! WASHINGTON. CHICAGO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



New Moon 

First Quarter 
Full, Moon.. .. 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon 



1 

7 
14 
23 
30 



U. M. 

44 M. 

11 7 E. 

*0 24 M. 

1 I M. 
1 50 E. 



H. M. 

32 M. 

10 55 E. 

*0 12 M. 

49 M. 

1 38 E. 



H. M. 

20 M. 

10 43 E. 

12 E. 

37 M. 

1 26 E. 



II. M. 



10 1 

11 18 
til 55 

44 



E. 
E. 
E. 
E. 



9 50 E. 

11 7 E. 

til 44 E. 

33 E. 



Day of 
Week. 



Friday 
Saturday 



Moon 
South. 



Moon's 
Place. 



EV. 10 :^ 20 

1 2 m 3 



Boston, New England, 
N.Y. State, Michigan, 
Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun 
Sets. 

H, M. 



Moon 
Sets. 



6 33 4 .54 sets. 
6 34'4 531 5 54 



Hi^h 
Water. 



11 48 

MORN. 



New York City, Phila., 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. 



Sun 
Rises. 

H. M. 



30 4 

31 4 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 
Sets. 



57 sets. 
56 5 .59 



High 
Water. 



8 30, 

9 171 



"Washington, 
Md., Va., Zy., 
Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 1 .Sun 
Rises. Sets. 

a. M. H. M. 



Moon 
Sets. 



a 27 o 

6 28 14 .591 6 4 



44) Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity. $ in lU. Day's length at New York, lOh. 22m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



; 1 58 


Til 17t 


6 36 


4 5] 


6 34 


30 


6 32 


4 54 


6 40: 


! 2 58 


f li 


6 37 


4 50 


7 26 


1 18; 


6 34 


4 53 


7 32 


4 


^ ]5| 


6 38 


4 49 


8 28 


2 11 


6 35 


4 52 


8 34 


5 1 


f 30i 


6 39 


4 48 


9 38 


8 7i 


6 36 


4 51 


9 44 


5 59 


V3 14; 


6 41 


4 47 


10 52 


4 7 


6 37 


4 50 


10 56 


6 54 


\3 28; 


6 42 


4 45 


MORN. 


5 12, 


6 38 


4 49 


MORN. 


7 46 


c 12! 


6 43 


4 44 


7 


6 19, 


6 40 


4 48 


10 



10 4 

10 53 

11 ,52 

MORN. I 
54; 

1 57| 

3 4: 



6 28 


4 58 


6 31 


4 57 


6 32 


4 56 


6 33 


4 55 


6 34 


4 54 


6 35 


4 53 


6 36 


4 52| 



6 46 

7 39 

8 41 

9 49 
11 1 

MORN. 

14 



45) Twenty-fourth Sunday after Trinity. 5 in ^^. Day's length at New York, 10h.6m. 



10 j Sunday 
11 1 Monday 
12; Tuesday 
13 1 Wednesday 10 

14 Thursday 

15 Friday 

16 Saturday 



8 35 


^ 26 6 44 


4 43 


1 21 


7 21 


6 41 


4 47 


1 23 


4 6 6 37 


4 51 


9 22 


K 10 


6 46 


4 42 


2 33 


8 18 


6 42 


4 46 


2 34 


5 2|6 38 


4 50 


10 9 


X 24 


'6 47 


4 41 


3 42 


9 10 


6 43 


4 45 


3 41 


5 55 


6 39 


4 49 


10 57 


cp 7 


6 48 


4 40 


4 53 


9 57 


\e 44 


4 44 


4 51 


6 43 


6 40 


4 48 


11 45 


T 20 


;6 49 


4 39 


RISES. 


10 44 


6 46 


4 43 


RISES. 


7 28 


6 41 


4 47 


MORN. 


« 3 


6 51 


4 39 


5 2 


11 25 


6 47 


4 42 


5 7 


8 8i6 43 


4 47 


36 


« 16 


l6 52 


4 38 


5 39 


EV. 9 


6 48 


4 41 


5 45 


8 53 


6 44 


4 46 



1 26 

2 35 

3 41 

4 49 

RISES. 
12 

51 



46) Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity. 2^ in ^. Day's length at New York, 9h 61m. 



17| Sunday 
18 Monday 
19! Tuesday 



20 
21 
22 
23 



Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



1 


27 


1 2 


20 


3 


12 


! 4 


3 


1 4 


51 


5 


37 


6 


21 



« 28, 

n 11 



n 



^ 



23; 

17: 

28' 
10 



6 53 

l6 54 
6 56 



6 231 

7 13: 



6 59 

7 



4 87 

|4 36 

'4 85 

4 84! 9 C 

|4 84;i0 6 

|4 33 11 8 

4 82 MORN. 



51 
38 
23 
10 
57 
46 



5 87 



49 4 
.50 '4 
514 
534 
54 4 
.55 4 
.56 4 



40 


6 29 


9 87 


89 


7 19 


10 21 


39 


8 14 


11 6 


38 


9 12 


11 .55 


38 


10 11 


EV.44 


37 


11 11 


1 84 


36 


MORN. 


2 25 



45 4 45 i 6 36 



46;4-44! 

474 44| 



7 26 

8 21 
6 48;4 43! 9 17 
6 49:4 43 10 16 
,6 50 4 42 11 15 
6 51 '4 42 MORN. 



47) Twenty-sixth Sunday after Trinity. ^ in :? . Day's length at New York, 9h.39m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 4; .9. 23 

7 46Ittji .5; 

8 28TTJI 181 



9 12^ 

I 9 .59=^ 
10 491^ 

II 45iTil 



9 
12 
13 
17 
27 

5 89 

6 53 



6 


29 


7 


21 


8 


11 


9 





9 


48: 


10 36i 


11 


25 



6 57 4 36 
6 .58^4 35 
6 .59 4 85 
4 85 
2 4 84 
814 84 
4 4 84 



11 


3 15 


I 18 


4 6 


2 18 


4 55 


8 16 


5 45 


4 25 


6 34 


5 35 


7 21 


6 49 


8 8 



6 52 4 41 

6 53; 4 40 

6 .55 4 40 

6 56 4 40 

;6 .57 4 40 



,58 4 
.50 4 



.80 
80 



22 

5 80 

6 -14 



•15th. 



t22d. 



CAPI^COf^NUS. 




12th Month. 



DECEMBER, 1872. 



31 Days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



BOSTON. NEW YORK. WASHINGTON.! CHICAGO. I ST. LOUIS. 



FlKST QCAKTEE 

Full Moon 

Last Qtjaetee. 
New Moon 



1-4 
22 
30 



H. M. 

6 52 M. 

5 E. 

9 28 E. 

1 52 M. 



H. M. 

6 40 M. 

4 48 E. 

9 16 E. 

1 40 M. 



H. M. 

6 2S M. 

4 36 E. 

9 4 E. 

1 28 M. 



U. M. 

5 46 M. 

3 54 E. 

8 22 E. 

46 M. 



H. M. 

5 35 M. 

3 43 E. 

8 11 E. 

35 M. 



Day of 
Week. 



Moon 
Sjuth. 



Moon's 
Place. 



Boston, New England, 
I N.T. State, Michigan,! 
I Wis., Iowa, & Oregon. 



New York City, Pliila.,! "Washington, 
Conn., N. Jersey, Pa., i Md., Va., Ky., 
Ohio, Ind., and 111. j Mo., and Cal. 



Sun 
Rises. 



Sun Moon 
Sets. Sete. 

H. M. 



High 
Water. 



Sun Moon i Hiph I Sun 
Sets. Sets. Water. 1 1 Rises. 

H. M. H. M. H. M. ||H. M. 



Sun 
Sets. 



Moon 

Sets. 



48) Advent Sunday. 



2 in t . 



Day's length at New York, 9h. 29m. 



1 Sunday 

2 Mouday 

3 Tuesday 


EV. 45 

1 48 

2 52 


4 Wednesday 


j 3 53 


5 Thursday 

6 Friday 

7 Saturday 


! 4 50 

5 44 

' 6 33 



277 
117 
267 
107 
25: 7 
9j|7 
23 7 



10 4 
114 



14 

15|4 
1G4 



29 
29 

28 
28 
28 
28 
28 



5 15,MOBN. 



6 15 

7 25 

8 40 

9 56 
11 13 

MOKN. 



15 

1 10 

2 5 

3 

3 56 

4 55 



J 


5 


7 


6 


7 


7 


■7 


8 


7 


9 


7 


10 


7 


11 



21 


9 1 


21 


9 56| 


31 


10 48' 


45 


11 45 





MOKN. 


15 


42| 


N. 


1 42 



39 5 27 
39, 6 28 
38 7 37 



8 50 
10 4 



38 11 18 



49) Second Sunday in Advent. 



S in m. 



Day's length at New York, 9h. 20m. 



8 Sunday 
9 1 Monday 

10 Tuesday 

11 Wednesday 

12 Thursday 

13 Friday 

1 4 Saturday 



7 20 


^C 7 7 17 


4 28 


8 6 


>£ 20 7 17 


4 28 


8 52 


T 3 7 18 


4 28 


9 40 


T 17,7 19 


4 28 


10 28 


T 29 7 20 


4 28 


|11 19 


« 12 17 21 


4 28 


.MORN. 


» 24 !7 22 


4 28 



25 

1 34 

2 42 1 

3 49^ 

4 57 



6 3:10 16! 7 

ttSES. ill 4 



i\7 12 


4 32 


26 


2 3817 6 


4 38 


^7 13 


4 32 


1 34 


3 36 7 7 


4 38 


t;7 14 


4 32 


2 40 


4 29 7 8 


4 38 


W 1^ 


4 32 


3 47 


5 24'7 9 


4 38 


17 15 


4 32 


4 54 


6 1.5 7 9 


4 39 


.;7 16 


4 33 


5 58 


7 2 7 10 


4 39 


7 16 


4 33 


RISES. 


7 47 7 11 


4 39 



27 

1 34 

2 39 

3 44 



50) Third Sunday in Advent. 



U in fl. 



Day's length at New York, 9h. 16m. 



15 Sunday 

16 Monday 

17 Tuesday 

18 Wednesday 

19 Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



11 


n 


7 


1 3 


n 


19 


1 55 


® 


1!' 


2 44 


© 


13l| 


3 31 


® 


25 


4 16 


^, 


6 


4 59 


^ 


18 



22 4 

23 4 
244 
24 14 

254 
264 
26 4 



5 4 

5 58 

6 55 

7 55 

8 55 

9 57 
10 57 



11 47| 

EV.3ll 

1 15! 



4l! 

23 

5 



174 
18,4 
184 
194 
204 
204 
2l'4 



33 5 
33 6 

33 7 

34 8 

34 8 

35 10 



101 8 31 7 l: 
5 9 18 7 12, 



4 
4 
Olio 1 7 13:4 
0,10 41 7 144 
59ill 23 7 14 4 
Oev. 8 7 15J4 
35 10 58 1 52:7 1514 



39, 
40| 
40 ' 
40! 

41 ! 



41 10 

42 11 



51) Fourth Sunday in Advent. 



^ in # . 



Day's length at New York, 9h. 15m. 



22' Sunday 
23 Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



i 5 40 


m ] 7 26 


4 31 


11 .58 


4 51! 


7 21 


4 36 


11 .59 


6 21 


m 13 7 27 


4 32 


MORN. 


5 37] 


7 22 


4 37 


MORN. 


7 3 


TTJl 2.57 27 


4 32 


1 


6 28 


7 22 


4 37 


59 


7 47 


^ 8 7 28 


4 33 


2 5 


7 22 7 23 


4 38 


2 3 


8 35 


^ 22, 7 28 


4 33 


3 14 


8 18|7 23 


4 39 


3 11 


9 27 


m 6 7 28 


4 34 


4 26 


9 15 7 23 


4 39 


4 22 


10 25 


iTj, 20 7 29 


4 35 


5 43 


10 13i 


7 23 


4 40 


5 .S8 



38:7 

2,5|7 

14|7 

7||7 



1 
2 

3 
4 
5 

6 l!i7 
6 .W 7 



2||7 17 
18 



4 42 11 59 



43 



4 43 
4 44 
4 44 
4 45 

IS'4 46 



MOEN. 

59 

2 1 

3 8 

4 18 

5 32 



_ 52) First Sunday after Christmas. 

2[l Siiiulay ~ 

30 Moiuliy 

31 Tuesday 



}^ in o. Day's length at New York, 9h. 16m. 

T>>3 7 IS 4 47 6 46 

8 517 19 4 47 8Em 

9 47 7 19 4 48 6 29 



11 28 


t 5 


7 29 


4 36 


6 58 1 1 11 


7 24 


4 40 


6 52 


EV.33 


f 20 


7 29 


4 37 


BETS. MORN. 


7 24 


4 41 


BKT8. 


I 38 


V3 5 


7 30 


4 37! 6 181 6 


7 24 


4 42 


6 23 



.NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
SHAKSPEARE'S VOYAGE OP LIFE. 



17 




And the men and women merely ijlayers : 




Thev have their exits 



And one man in his time 
ph\ys many parts, ^ 





and their entrances ; 



His acts being seven ages. 



18 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE DAWN OF LIFE. 




^. 







first, tlie infant, 
i^lctoiing anb puking in tl)c nurse's arms : 



Children are certain cares, but uncertain comforts. 

More children have been hurt by overfeeding than ever died 

of hunger. 
Best to bend while it is a twig. 
Children have wide ears and long tongues. 

Children pick up words a.s pigeons pens, ^ 

And utter them ngain ns God shall please. 

When children stand quiet they have done some harm 
Children and fools have merry lives. 
Children, when little, make parents fools. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



IJ) 



THE MORNING OF LIFE. 





nb tlien, tlie toliimng scI)ool-bon, toitl) l)is satcl)el, 
^nb sfiining Tnorning face, creeping like snail 



Mntoillinglg to school : 



Years teach more than liooks. 

School-boys are the most reasonable people in the world : 

they care not how little they have for their money. 
Train up a child in the way he should go. 
Be patient, and you shall have patient children. 
A single fact is worth a ship-load of argument. 
Look to the budding before it has time to ripen into mischief. 
The real orphan is not he who has lost his father, but he 

whose father gave him no education. 



20 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE SPRING OF LIFE. 





x^- - 



tlicn, ll)c iovcY, 
0igl)ing like fitrnace, mil) a tooful ballab 
XUabe to Ijie mistress's enebrom. 

The course of true love never runs smooth. 

Tlie follies of youth are food for repentance in old age. 

"Tis better to be hai)])v than wise. 

The world is a net : the more we stir in it the more we get 

entangled. 
So 'tis as decreed above, that, first or last, we all must love. 
Beauty is but a transient l)lossom. Beauty is but skin deep. 
Life is half spent before we know what it is. 
Love of lads and fire of chats is soon in and soon out. 



NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE SUMMER OF LIFE. 



21 





I) en, a eolMer, 
-full of strange oatlis, anb bearbeb like the path, 
leaions in l)onor, snbben anb quick in quarrel, 
Seeking the bubble reputation 
€uen in tl)e cannon's moutl) : 



The brave man seeks not popular applause. 
Then comes thy glory in the summer months. 
Force is the brute's, but honor is of man. 
The hour finds its man, the man the hour. 
None but the brave deserve the fair. 
A soldier's honor is dearer than his life. 



22 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE MERIDIAN OF LIFE. 





nb tl)en, tlie justice, 
In fair rouiib bellji, toitl) goob capon lineb, 
iXlitI) cncs sctjerc, axxb bcarb of formal cnt, 
iTull of toisc saujs anb mobcrn instances. 
%vib so \]c plans l)is part : 



Justice is a science which is only well taught by virtue. 

So many men, so many minds. 

A thin<? of men, by men appointed, for good or for evil. 

("irciimstnnces alter cases. 

Evil coinmunications corrupt good manners. 

Adult children arc not all alike. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE DECLINE, OR AUTUMN OF LIFE. 



23 



If/' i 





lie sijetli age sliifts 
Into tl)e lean anb slipper'b pantaloon ; 
tDitl) spectacles on nose, anb poncl) on sibe ; 
^is nontliful liose tnell saneb, a tnorlb too toibe 
£ox Iiis slirnnk sliank ; mxb i)\B big ntattln t^oice, 
^nrning again toroarb cl)iibisl) treble, pipes 
^nb toijistles in l)is sonnb. 



J Autumn is come ! The gladness of the spring, the revelings 
ot summer hours are sped. 
A good life keeps off wrinkles. 



24 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 
THE WINTER OF LIFE. 





I)e last scene of all, 
®:l)at enbs this strange cDcntfnl liistorn, 
3s second diilbisliness, anh mere obliuion; 
Sans teetl), sans cnes, sans taste, sans euern 
tiling. 



He heapeth up riclief?, and knoweth not who shall gather tlieni. 

And man's life passeth thus away, a tiling of joy and sorrow. 

You shall here see your follies reflected. 

Time, that devours all things. 

AH are desirous to win the |>rize. 

I am what thou shall he. I have heen what thou art. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




^^^ 



^^jf- 



f&?AO^^ 



YE GAMBOLIER. 

With Kings and Queens, as well as Knaves, 

Y^ Gambolier doth Deal ; 
He lives on Stakes, but doetli not 

Aught for y^ public Weal. 

Full oft y^ merrie Gambolier 

In gay attire is seen ; 
Y^ sportive cuss doth love to Play 

And Gambol on y^ Green. 

He fliin doth Cut, he loves y^ Chips, 

When he to balls doth go ; 
Y^ Double Shuffle is for him, 

Y^ Break-down for his foe. 



>-. y- 






:i^i^ 



^. 






bA^J 



^ 






No storms appall y^ Gambolier 

For winds he doth not reck ; 
For he is ever on y^ Seize, 

And traveleth on y« Deck, 

Y^ Gambolier doth ever speak 

Like Hamlet, by y^ Card ; 
A soldier he Avho serveth not. 

Save on y^ Picquet-guard. 

Ever y^ swifter passeth he 

Y^ more he lags behind. 
And eke more sharply doth he See 

When he is Going Blind. 

When Death doth Call, and rakes his Pile, 

No panic doth he feel ; 
He shuffles off this mortal coil, 

And cutteth for y^ De'il. 

JoHX Hay. 



Evert man makes hiz ovn\ pedigree, and the best pedigree iz a clear conscience. 
The richest man ov all iz he who haz got but little, but haz got all he wants. 
Thare iz no sekts nor religious disputes among the heathen : they all of them cook a 
missionary in the same way. — Josh Billings. 



20 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



THE LATE BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

BY MARK TWAIN. 




[nevee put off till to-mokrow what you can do tue bay after to-morbow just A8 

WELL.— B. F.] 

This party was one of those persons whom they call philosophers. He was born 
twins, being born simultaneously in two different houses in the city of Boston. These 
houses remain unto this clay, and have signs upon them worded in accordance with the 
foots. The signs are considered well enough to have, though not necessary, because 
the inhabitants point out the two birthplaces to the stranger anyhow, and sometimes as 
often as several times in the same day. The subject of this memoir was of a vicious 
disposition, and early prostituted his talents to the invention of maxims and aphorisms 
calculated to inflict suftering upon the rising generation of all subsequent ages. His 
simplest acts, also, were contrived with a view to their being held up for the emulation 
of boys forever — boys who might otherwise have been hapjty. It was in this spirit that 
he became the son of a soap-boiler, and, probably, for no other reason than that the ef- 
forts of all future boys who tried to be any thing might be looked upon with suspicion 
unless they were the sons of soap-boilers. With a malevolence which is without paral- 
lel in historv, he would work all dav, and 
then sit up nights, and let on to be study- 
ing algebra by the light of a smouldering 
fire, so that all the boys might have to do 
that also, or else have Benjamin Frank- 
lin thrown upon them. Not satisfied 
with these proceedings, he had a fashion 
of living wholly on bread and water, and 
studying astronomy at meal-time — a 
thing whicli has brouglit aHiictii)n to mil- 
lions of boys since, whose fatliers had read Frankhn's jternirious biography. 

His maxims were fidl of animosity toward boys, Nowadays a boy can not follow out 
a single natural instinct without tumbling over some of those everlasting aphorisms, and 
hearing from Franklin on tlie s])ot. If lie buys two cents' worth of pea-nuts, his father 
says, '• Jiemember what Franklin has said, luy son — 'A groat a day is a penny a year ;' " 





NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



27 





and the comfort is all gone out of those pea-nuts. If he wants to spin his top when he 
is done work^his father quotes, "Procrastination is the thief of time." If he does a 
virtuous action, he never gets any thing for it,- because "virtue is its own reward." 
And that boy is hounded to death, and robbed of his natural rest, because Franklin said 
once in one of his inspired flights of malignity — 

"Early to bed and early to rise, 
Make a man healthy, wealthy, and wise." 

As if it were any object to a boy to be healthy, and wealthy, and wise on such terms. 
The sorrow that that maxim has cost me, through my parents experimenting me with 
it, tongue can not tell. Tlie legit- 
imate result is my present state of 
general debility, indigence, and men- 
tal aberration. My parents used to 
have me up before 9 o'clock in the 
morning, sometimes, when I was a 
boy. If they had let me take my 
natural rest, where would I have been 
now ? Keeping store, no doubt, and 
respected by all. 

And what an adroit old adventurer the subject of this memoir Avas! In order to get 
a chance to fly his kite on Sunday, he used to hang a key on the string, and let on to be 
fishing by lightning, and a guileless public would go home chirping about the "wis- 
dom" and the " genius" of the hoary Sabbath-breaker. He invented a stove that would 
smoke your head ofi^ in five hours by the clock. * * * He was always proud of 
telling how he entered Philadelphia for the first time with nothing in the world but two 
shillings in his pocket and four rolls of bread under his arm. But really, when you 
come to examine it critically, it was nothing. Any body could have done it. * * =i< 
Benjamin Franklin did a great many notable things for his country, and made her 
young name to be honored in many lands as the mother of such a son. It is not the 
idea of this memoir to ignore that or cover it up. No ; the simple idea of it is to snub 
those pretentious maxims of his, which he worked up with a great show of originalitv 
out of truisms that had become wearisome platitudes as early as the dispersion from 
Babel, and also to snub his store and his military insjjirations, his unseemly endeavor 
to make himself conspicuous when he entered Philadelphia, and his flying his kite, and 
fooling away his time in all sorts of such ways, when he ought to have been foraging for 
soap-fat or constructing candles. I merely desired to do away with somewhat of the 
prevalent calamitous idea among heads of families that FrankUn acquired his great gen- 
ius by working for nothing, studying by moonlight, and getting up in the night instead 
of waiting till morning like a Ch'istian, and that this programme, rigidly inflicted, will 
make a Franklin of every father's fool. 
It is time these gentlemen were finding 
out that these execrable eccentricities 
of instinct and conduct are only the 
evidences of genius, not the creators 
of it. I wish I had been the father 
of my parents long enough to make 
them comprehend this truth, and thus 
prepare them to let their son have an 
easier time of it. When I was a child 
I had to boil soap, notwithstanding my fother was wealthy, and I had to get up early and 
study geometry at breakfast, and peddle my own poetry, and do every thing just as Frank- 
lin did, in the solemn hope that I would be a Franklin some day. And here I am. 





2g 



NAST'S ALMANA C FOR 1872. 



CASABIANCA; OR, THE OBSTINATE SAILOR-BOY. 










S\%:;/t^'^ 



-,.V' 



HE boy stood on the burning deck, 
He leaned against the pump ; 

A sailor said who saw him there, 
"Young fellow, you're a trump I" 



And bravely he the music faced. 
In spite of smoke and flame ; 

Too plucky he to "fly the track" — 
That little boy was "game." 

Fast from the deck the sailors fled, 
But still he did not flinch ; 

Though things were getting very hot, 
" He wouldn't budge an inch." 




"Leave, leave the ship!" a sailor cried, 

But still he calmly staid ; 
And when they bill him save himself. 

He answered them, "That's ]>Iayud." 



N AST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

He strove for honor and for fame, 

And not for worldly pelf: 
*'I.will not leave my post," he cried; 

"You know how 'tis yom'self." 

The flames devoured the stately ship ; 

It was an awful scene. 
And yet the boys were not on hand 

Who "run with the machine." 



29 




Then came a blast, and boy and all 

Were hurled toward the sky ; 
The fire had reached the magazine — 

" Say, how is that for high ?" 

George P. Webster. 




HE STILL LIVES. 



30 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



SAM WELLER'S MORAL TALE. 

BY CHARLES DICKENS. 

II, you've woke up at last, have you ?" 
said ham. 

The fat boy nodded. 
" 111 tell you what it is, young boa 
constructer," said Mr. AVeller, im- 
pressively, " if you don't sleep a little 
less, and exercise a little more, wen 
you comes to be a man you'll lay your- 
self open to the same sort of personal 
inconwenience as was inflicted on the 
old gen'l'm'n as wore the pigtail." 

"What did they do to him?" in- 
quired the fat boy, in a faltering voice. 
"I'm a-goin' to tell you," replied 
iMr. Weller ; "he was one o' the lar- 
gest patterns as was ever turned out 
— reg'lar fat man, as hadn't caught a 
glimpse of his own shoes for five-and- 
forty year. " 
" Lor !" exclaimed Emma. 

"Xo, that he hadn't, my dear," Said Mr. Weller; "and if you'd put an e.xact model 
of his own legs on the dinin' table afore him, he wouldn't ha' known 'em. Well, he 
always walks to his office with a wery handsome gold Avatch-chain hanging out about 
a foot and a quarter, and a gold watch in his fob pocket as was worth — I'm afraid to 
say how much, but as much as a watch can be — a large, heavy, round manafacter, as 
stout for a watch as he was for a man, and with a big foce in proportion. ' Yoit'd bet- 
ter not carry that 'ere watch,' says the old gen'l'm'n's friends ; 'you'll be robbed on it,' 
says they. ' Shall I ?' says he. ' Yes, you will,' says they. ' Veil,' says he, ' I should 
like to see the thief as could get this here watch out, for I'm blest if /ever can, it's such 
a tight fit,' says he; 'and venever I wants to know what's o'clock, I'm obliged to stare 






NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



31 





* ^/\AA AAAAi*MvK*^SS^VT=i 



into the bakers' shops,' he says. Well, then he laughs as hearty as if he was a goin' to 
pieces, and out he walks agin' with his powdered head and pigtail, and rolls down the 
Strand vith the chain hangin' out furder than ever, and the great round watch almost 
bustin' through his gray kersey smalls. There warn't a pickpocket in all London as 
didn't take a pull at that chain ; but the chain 'ud never break, and the watch 'ud never 



come out, so they soon got tired 
o' dragging such a heavy old 
gen'l'm'n along the pavement, 
and he'd go home and laugh 
till the pigtail wibrated like the 
penderlum of a Dutch clock. 
At last, one day, the old gen'l'- 
m'n was a rollin' along, and he 
'sees a pickpocket as he know'd 
by sight a-comin' up, arm in 




arm vith a little boy vith a wery 
large head. ' Here's a game,' 
says the old gen'l'm'n to him- 
self; ' they're a-goin' to have 
another try, but it won't do ! ' 
So he begins a-chucklin' wery 
hearty, wen, all of a sudden, 
the little boy leaves hold of the 
pickpocket's arm, and rushes 
headforemost straight into the 



old gen'l'm'n's stomach, and for a moment doubles him right up vith the pain. ' Mur- 




der!' says the old gen'l'm'n. 'AH right, sir,' says the pickpocket, a wisperin' in his 



32 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



ear. And wen he come straight agin, the watch and chain was gone, and, what's 
worse than that, the old gen I'm'n's digestion was all wrong ever artervards, to the wery 
last day of his life ; so just you look about you, young feller, and take care you don't get 
too fat." 

As Mr. Weller concluded this moral tale, with which the ftit boy appeared much af- 
fected, they all three repaired to the large kitchen, in which the family were by this time 
assembled, according to annual custom on Christmas eve, observed by old Wardle's fore- 
fathers from time immemorial. 



JANE BLUDSOE, OF NATCHEZ. 





UM feller's wrote a pome 

'Bout Bludso ; they call him Jim. 
I know'd to my cost the Prarie Bell, 
And a heap too much about him. 

^ " He never flunked and he never lied," 
Ses the pote, so pert and slick ; 
But the way that feller lied to me 
Would a made Ananieras sick. 




NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

He swore that he loved me fair and true — 
O Lord, how that chap did sware ! 

Then he tuck the money I'd saved for years. 
And went otF to Pike on a tare. 



33 




He vow'd that he'd never seed 

Any other gal he cud like, 
And all the time he'd been married years 

To that critter up in Pike. 




He never flunked — oh no, not him ! 

You orter have seed us met. 
When I caught him in Pike with his other wife — 

There was flunkin' then, you bet. 

C 



34 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




And he never was engineer — 
A deck-hand, and nothing more ; 

And never went up on the Prarie Belle 
But was fust to scuttle ashore. 

He got up that yam a purpus 

To fool the folks about ; 
But I've follerd him up, you better believe, 

Determined to find him out, 




Till I tracked him here to York. 

He looked like a lump of whitin', 
When I caught him, as airy as ever you please, 

In the Tribune offis ritin'. 

Frank Bellew, 



Law is law. It is like an ignis fatuus : those who follow the delusive guide too 
often find themselves inextricably involved in a bog. 

It is like an eel-trap : very easy to get I'n/o, but very difficult to get otit of 

It is like a razor, whidi requires "a strong back," keenness, and an excellent tem- 
per. 

N.B. — Many of tliose who get once shaved seldom risk a second operation. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



35 





HOW TU PICK OUT A GOOD HOSS. 

BY JOSH BILLINGS. 

First. — Let the color be a sorrel, a 
roan, a red, a gray, a white, a blak, a 
blue, a green, a chesnut, a brown, a 
dapple, a spotted, a cream, a buckskin, 
or sum other good color. 

ASec^on.y.-^Examin hiz ears ; see that 
he haz got tew ears, and pound a tin 
pan cluss to him, tu find out whether 
hiz hearing iz good. All bosses are 
dum, but a deff and dum boss are not 
desirable. 

Third. — Look well tu hiz eyes; see 
that he haz got a pupil in hiz eyes, and not too large a one neither ; bosses with too 
large pupils in their eyes are near-sighted, and kant see oats, and bav tu wear green 
goggles, and green goggles make a boss look tu mutch like a trakt pedlar. 

Fourth. — Feel ov bis neck with the inside ov yure right band ; see that the spinal 
coUum iz well fatted, and runs the whole length ov him from fore tu aft — a boss with- 
out a good phatt spinal collum from fore tu aft aint worth — (speakin sudden) — aint 
worth a Avell defined cuss. 

Five. — Put yure band on hiz breast (this iz allowable in the case ov a quadriped); 
see if hiz barte kan beat 70 ; squeeze biz fore leggs tu see if he iz well muscled ; lift up 
biz before feet and see if thare iz enny frogs in them — frogs keep a boss's feet cool and 
sweet, just az they do a well or a spring ov water. 

Six. — Look well tu hiz shoes; see what number he wears — number 8 iz about 
right. 

Seven. — Run yure hand along the dividing ridge ov hiz boddy, from the top ov hiz 
Avithers tu the commencement ov his tail (or dorsul vertibra), and pinch him az you go 
along, tu see if be knows how tu kick. 

Eifjht. — Look on his hind legs for sum spa-vdns, kurbs, windgalls, ringbones, skratches, 
quittors, thrush, grease-heels, thorough-pins, spring-halt, quarter-kracks ; see if he haz 
got a whirl-bone ; look for sum pin-hips ; bunt for strains in the back tendons, let- 
downs, and capped hocks. 

Nine. — Investigate hiz teeth; see if be aint 14 years (5ld last May, with teeth filed 
down, and a six-year old black mark burnt intu the top ov them with a hot iron. 

Ten. — Smell of biz breti b tu see if he haint got sum glanders ; look jitst back ov biz 
ears for sigbns of pole-evil ; pinch him on the top ov hiz withers for a fistula, and look 
sharp at both shotUders for a sweeny. 

Eleven. — Hook him tu a waggon that rattles, drive him up tu an Irishman and hiz 
wheelbarrow, meet a rag-merchant \vith cow-bells strung acrost the top ov hiz cart, let 
an express train pass him at 45 miles tu the hour, when he is swetty heave a buffalo 
robe over him tu keep oph the cold, ride him with an urabrel bighsted, and learn hiz 
opinyun ov these things. 

Twelve. — Prospekt biz wind, sarch diligently for the heaves, ask if he iz a roarer, 
and don't be afraid tu find out if he iz a whistler. 

Thirteen. — Be sure that he aint a krib-biter, aint balky, aint a weaver, and dont ])ull 
at the baiter. 

Tbeze are a few simple things tu be looked at in buying a good family hoss ; there iz 
a grate menny other things tu be looked at (at yure leizure) after you have bought him. 



30 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



DENTIST 



Good bosses are skarse, and good men, that deal in enny kind ov bosses, are skarser. 
Ask a man all about bis wife, and be may tell you ; examine bira cluss for a Smiday- 
scbool teacber, and find him all on the square ; send him tu the New York Legislature, 
and rejoice that money won't buy him ; lend him seven hundred dollars in the highway 
without witness or note ; even swop dorgs with him with 
perfekt impunity ; but when you buy a 
good family hoss ov him, young, sound, 
and trew, watch the man cluss, and 
make up yure mind besides that you 
will have tu ask the Lord tu forgive 
him. 

*'^An honest man iz the noblest work 
ov God;" tbis famus saying waz writ- 
ten, in grate anguish of heart, by the 
late Alexander Pope just after buy- 
ing a good family hoss. 





AUNT JERUSHA. A NEW ENGLAND FARM BALLAD. 



[time: night before thanksgiving.] 




Aunt Jkrusha sat late by the hot kitchen stove. 

But her fancies were truant, and bound to rove ; 

And her eyelids grew wet with unbidden tears, 

As her thoughts went wandering back through the years. 

" Ah ! well," she sighed low, in a weary way, 
"To-morrow will bring us Thanksgiving day; 
And the house is crammed full of all good cheer 
For the old and the voung who'll be crowding here. 




" Under stacks of uiiuce-pics bend the buttery slielves, 
And cakes, where the children can stuff themselves 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

From the wide-mouthed crock, just behind the door, 
Till they whimper because they can't hold no more. 



37 




" And there's turkey and chicken-pie, beef, tongue, and ham, 
Cider, barberry sauce, and blackberry jam ; 
And lots of every thing else you can think 
That company looks for to eat and drink. 

"I'll try to be cheerful, and laugh with the rest, 
But it's climbin' up hill with a dull heart to jest ; 
And mine has been good as dead years gone, be sure, 
For I was the oldest, and father was poor. 

"And so for my brothers and sisters I toiled. 
Till my temper was fretted, my good looks was spoiled , 
And they twitted me once, and yet I was still young, 
That my face was as ugly and sharp as my tongue. 




*' So I'd never the chances my sisters all had ; 
1 was always too busy to chat with a lad ; • 

They was all married young, bein' pretty, you see. 
But nobody never came courtin' to me. 

"And so— well, well ! Brother's consid'rate and kind. 
And his wife— well, there isn't a great deal to mind ; 
And he gives me a good home, but 3'et I'd much ruther 
Have a man of ray own than the verj' best brother. 

"A man sp'ils by linn' alone, they do say. 

And with women, I'm 'fraid, it is much the same way ; 

But, though I am always as willin' as can be, 

Here I'm askin' myself yet, 'Where can the man be?' 



38 



NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




" It's a sin and a shame to keep lone women waitin', 
That ain't noways averse to the fashion of matin' ; 
And if men are too stingy or bashful to tell 'em, 
The law ought to step in, and just take and compel 'em. 




"But I notice, ■whenever the law interferes, 
It's always to come between sweethearts and dears ; 
'Twas just so in old times, when we was all girls, 
Fellers had to be careful in flirtin' with curls ; 

"For the slectmen was always a mousin' about, 

To see just how late the young people staid out ; 

And a man could be whipped through the town of a Monday 

For kissin' his sweetheart or wrfe of a Sunday. 




-^-wou J,rrTi-i .-mtWilfmtmi nj illlllln 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

"I don't want no such laws ! But if I'd my own way, 
There'd not be an old bachelor after to-day ; 
For, whenever a soul of era reached forty-two, 
I'd have 'em all put up and sold at vendue. 

"And there ain't the least doubt 'twould be pop'lar with those 
Who are bach'lors because they hain't spunk to propose, 
As is mostly the case ; and then, as for the bidders. 
The old maids should take precedence over the widders. 



89 




" Ah ! well, it's the dream of a silly old brain ; 
What's the use of such fancies, that only give pain ? 
Good gracious ! the clock's striking ten, 's I'm alive, 
And I must be up in the mornin' at five. 

" PVaps it's better as 'tis, I know, after all's said , 
But, if some one came courtin', and asked me to wed, 
I ain't a bit certain, as sm-e as I'm sittin' 
In this creakv old chair, as I'd give him the mitten." 

S. S. CONANT. 




Labor's "x.'^s^ 



4® 



NAST'S ALMANAC 



^'OR 



1872. 



THE EARLY TRAINING OF NASBY. 

(Extract from an autobiography writteu by himself, bnt rendered in 
good English by a younger brother, who learned to spell in bis 
younger days.) 

Modesty being the most prominent trait in my character, 
it is with reluctance that I speali of myself. In this one par- 
ticular, George Francis Train and myself are very much alike ; 
the only difl'erence being, G. F. manages to make a good liv- 
ing out of his modesty, while I don't. But, modest as I am, 
I must say that I am a most excellent man. Indeed, I com- 
menced being good at a ver}' early age, and built myself up 
on the best models. I was yet an infant when I read the af- 
fecting story of the hacking down of the cherry-tree by George 
Washington, and his manly statement to his father that he 
could not tell a lie. I read the story, and it filled me with a 
desire to surpass him. I was not going to allow^ any such boy 
as George Washington, if he did afterward get to be a Pres- 
ident, excel me in the moralities. Immediately I seized a 
hatchet, and cut down the most valuable cherry-tree my father 
had ; and, more, I dug up the roots and burned the branches, so 
that by no means could the variety be preserved ; and I went a 
' skating one Sunday, that I might confess the two faults, and 
be wept over and forgiven on account of my extreme truthful- 
^ ness. The experiments were, I regret to say, partial failures. 
I was very much like George Washington ; but, the trouble 
was, my father didn't resemble George Washington's father to any alarming extent, which 
was essential to the success of my scheme. " Did you cut down that cherry-tree ?" 





asked he. " Father, I can not tell a lie. I did it with my little hatchet," I answered, 
strikmg the proper attitude for the old gentleman to shed tears on me. But he didn't 
shed. He remarked that he had rather I had told a thousand lies tlum to have cut down 
that particular tree, and lie whipped me till I was in a state of exaspcvjiting rawness. 
The same devotion to truth is characteristic of my children. Truth is their weakness. 
They read the same story ; but, alas ! I had no horticultural tastes, and, therefore, no gar- 
tk'ii, and, as a matter of course, no cherry-trees about my house. At the ajje of eliriit, 
my eldest hankered for a cherry-tree. " Where is the tree for me to hack V" he i)erpet- 
ualLy asked. At ten he planted one, and nursed it, and watered it, and pniiied it, that 
at twelve he might hack it down, and manfully confess that he did it with his little 
hatchet ! Since that I have phinted trees for them. The moment a male child is born 
to me, I plant a cherry-tree for him. There have been ten clierry-trees about my hou.'se 
—there are ten decaying stumps there now, to which I point w"itli pride, as evidences 
of the entire devotion of my children to truth. I shall never be a President, but it 
^eems to me there must be one in the family. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



41 



A NIGHT'S PLEASURE. 

BY W. M. THACKERAY. 




HE composer of the Overture of the New Grand 
Comic Christmas Pantomime," Harlequin and the 
Fairy of the Spangled Pocket-handkerchief, or the 
Prince of the Enchanted Nose," arrayed in a bran- 
new Christmas suit, with his wristbands and collar 
turned elegantly over his cuffs and embroidered 
satin tie, takes a place at his desk, waves his stick, 
and away the Pantomime Overture begins. 

I pity a man who can't appreciate a Pantomime 
Overture. Children do not like it : they say, 
" Hang it, I wish the Pantomime would begin ;" 
but for us it is always a pleasant moment of reflection and enjoyment. It is not diffi- 
cult music to understand, like that of your Mendelssohns and Beethovens, whose sym- 
phonies and sonatas Mrs. Spec states must be heard a score of times before you can 
comprehend them. But of the proper Pantomime-music I am a delighted'connoisseur. 
Perhaps it is because you meet so many old friends in these compositions consorting 
together in the queerest manner, and occasioning numberless pleasant surprises. Hark ! 
there goes "Old Dan Tucker" wandering into the " Groves of Blarney;" our friends 
the "Scots wha hae wi' Wallace bled" march rapidly down "Wapping Old Stairs," 
from which the "Figlia del Reggimento" comes bounding briskly, when she is met, 
embraced, and carried off by " Billy Taylor," that brisk young fellow. 

All this while you are thinking, with a faint, sickly kind of hope, that perhaps the 
Pantomime may be a good one ; something like " Harlequin and the Golden Orange- 
tree," Avhich you recollect in your youth; something like "Fortunio," that marvelous 
and delightful piece of buffoonery, which realized the most gorgeous visions of the ab- 
surd. You may be happy, perchance ; a glimpse of the old days may come back to 
you. Lives there the man with soul so dead, the being ever so blase and travel-worn, 
who does not feel some shock and thrill still— just at that moment when the bell (the 
dear and familiar bell of your youth) begins to tingle, and the curtain to rise, and the 



42 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




large shoes and ankles, the flesh-colored leggins, the crumpled knees, the gorgeous robes 
and masks finally, of the actors ranged on the stage to shout the opening chorus. 

All i-ound the house you hear a great gasping a-ha-a from a thousand children's 
throats. Enjoyment is going to give place to Hope. Desire is about to be realized. 
Oh you blind little brats ! Clap your hands, and crane over the boxes, and open your 
eyes with happy wonder ! Clap your hands now. In three weeks more the Reverend 
Doctor Swishtail expects the return of his young friends to Sugarcane House. 
********* 

King Beak, emperor of the Romans, having invited alf the neighboring princes, 
fairies, and enchantei's to the feast at which he celebrated the marriage of his only son, 
Prince Aquiline, unluckily gave the liver-wing of the fowl which he was carving to the 
prince's godmother, the Fairy Bandanna, while he put the gizzard-pinion on the plate 
of the Enchanter Gorgibus, king of the Maraschino Mountains, and father of the 
Princess Rosolia, to whom the Prince was affianced. 






'■^ 




The outraged Gorgibus rose from the table in a fury, smashed his ])late of chicken 
over the head of King Beak's chamberlain, and wished that Prince Aquiline's nose 
might grow on the instant as long as the sausage before him. 

It did so; the screaming ])niicess rushed away from her bridegroom, and her father, 
breaking off^ the match with the house of Beak, ordered his daughter to be carried in 
his sedan by the two giant-porters, (lor and Gogstay, to his castle in the Juniper Forest, 
by the side of the bitter waters of the Absinthine liake. whitlier, after upsetting the 
marriage-tables and flooring King Heak in a liingle coniliat, he bim-elf repaired. 

The latter monarch could not Ijear to see or even to hear his distigured son. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



43 




"When the Prince Aquiline blew his unfortunate and monstrous nose, the windows of 
his father's palace broke ; the locks of the doors started ; the dishes and glasses of the 
king's banquet jingled and^smashed as they do on board a steam-boat in a storm ; the 
liquor turned sour ; the chancellor's wig started off his head ; and his royal father, 
disgusted with his son's appearance, drove him forth from his palace, and banished him 
the kingdom. 







Life was a burden to him on account of that nose. He fled from a world in which 
he was ashamed to show it, and would have preferred a perfect solitude, but that he was 
obliged to engage one faithful attendant to give him sijjulF (his only consolation), and to 
keep his odious nose in order. 




44 



NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



But as he was wandering in a lonely forest, entangling his miserable trunk in the 
thickets, and causing the birds to fly scared from the branches, and the lions, stags, and 
foxes to sneak away in terror as they heard the tremendous booming which issued from 
the fated prince whenever he had occasion to use his pocket-handkerchief, the Fairy 
oFthe Bandanna Islands took pity on him, and, descending in her car drawn by doves, 
gave him a 'kerchief which rendered him in\4sible whenever he placed it over his mon- 
strous proboscis. 



/■1 . /'. 




v^^iF^^^fi^^ 




Having occasion to blow his nose (which he was obliged to do pretty frequently, for 
he had taken cold while lying out among the rocks and morasses in the rainy, miserable 
nights, so that the peasants, when they heard him snoring fitfully, thought that storms 
were abroad) at the gates of a castle by whidi he was passing, the door burst open, and 
the Irish Giant (afterward Clown, indeed) came out, and wondering looked about, furi- 
ous to see no one. 




The prince entered into the castle, and whom should he find there but the Princess 
Ilosolia, still plunged in despair. Her father snubbed her perpetually. "I wish he 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



would snub me !" exclaimed the prince, pointing to his own monstrous deformity. In 
spite of his misfortune, she still remembered her prince. "Even with his nose," the 
faithful princess cried, " I love him more than all the world beside!" 





At this declaration of unalterable fidelity, the prince flung away the handkerchief, 
and knelt in rapture at the princess's feet. She was a little scared at first by the hid- 




eousness of the distorted beirg before her — but what will not woman's faith over- 
come ? Hiding her head on liis shoulder (and so losing sight of his misfortune), she 




40 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



vowed to love him still (in those broken verses which only princesses in Pantomimes 
deliver}. 

At this instant King Gorgibus, the giants, the king's household, with clubs and bat- 
tle-axes, rushed in. Drawing his immense cimeter, and seizing the prince by his too 
prominent feature, he was just on the point of sacrificing him, when — when, I need not 
say, the Fairy Bandanna (Miss Bendigo), in her amaranthine car drawn by Paphian 




doves, aj)peared and put a stop to the massacre. King Gorgibus became Pantaloon, 
the two giants first and second Clowns, and the prince and princess (who had been, all 
the time of the Fairy's speech, and actually while under their father's cimeter, unhook- 
ing their dresses) became the most elegant Harleqiiin and Columbine that I have seen 
for many a long day. The nose flew up to the ceiling, the music began a jig, and the 
two Clowns, after saying " How are you ?" went and knocked down Pantaloon. 




Self love is a mote in every man's eye. 

The defects of the mind, like those of the face, increase with age< 

No fool like an old fool. 

The miser is his own executioner ; a beggar in the midst of wealt?. 

We should at least do something to show that we have lived. 

Few men take life in earnest. 

Few men will be better than their interest and habits bid them. 

Step after step the ladder is ascended. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



47 



ADVICE TO LITTLE GIRLS. 

BY MARK TWAIN. 




Good little girls ought not to make mouths at their teachers for every trifling offense. 
This retaliation should only be resorted to under peculiarly aggraA-ated circumstances. 

If you have nothing but a rag doll stuffed with saw-dust, while one of your more 
fortunate little playmates has a costly china one, you should treat her with a show of 
kindness nevertheless. And you ought not to attempt to make a forcible swap with 
liei" unless your conscience would justify you in it, and you know you are able to do it. 

You ought never to take your little brother's "chewing-gum" away from him by 
main force ; it is better to rope him in with the promise of the first two dollars and a 
half you find floating down the river on a grindstone. In the artless simplicity natural 
to his time of life, he will regard it as a perfectly fair transaction. In all ages of the 
world this eininently plausible fiction has lured the obtuse infant to financial ruin and 
disaster. 

If at any time you find it necessary to correct your brother, do not correct him with 
mud — never, on any account, throw mud at him, because it will spoil his clothes. It 
is better to scald him a little, for then you attain desirable results. You secure his 
immediate attention to the lessons you are inculcating, and at the same time your hot 
water Avill have a tendency to remove impurities from his person, and possibly the skin, 
in spots. * 

If your mother tells you to do a thing, it is wrong to reply that you won't. It is 
better and more becoming to intimate that you will do as she bids you, and then after- 
ward act quietly in the matter according to the dictates of your best judgment. 

You should ever bear in mind that it is to your kind parents that you are indebted 
for your food, and your nice bed, and for your beautiful clothes, and for the privilege oi 
staying home from school when you let on that -you are sick. Therefore you ought to 
respect their little prejudices, and humor their little whims, and put up yvith their foibles 
until they get to crowding you too much. 

Good little girls always show marked deference for the aged. You ought never to 
"sass" old people unless they "sass" you first. 



48 



NASTS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



THE BEGGAR-MAID. 

BY A. TENNYSON. 



NOTICE 

70 

AUTHORS 

AND 

.-ARTISTS 
LEAVE 

All 
H£)PE, 
Ye that 
E W T E R 



r'ERIOCIMLS 




THE SUBLIME AND THE RIDICULOUS. 

" AFTEE TOF, SIR." 



Her arms across her breast she laid ; 
She was more fair than words can say: 



ox,o "'''"% 




Harefooted came the beggar-maid 
Before the king Cophetim. 




In robe and crown the king stepped down 
To meet and greet her on her way ; 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



49 




' It is no wonder," said the lords, 
" She is more beautiful than day. 




As shines the moon in clouded skies. 
She in her poor attire was seen ) 




One praised her ankles, one her eyes, 



^. 



^^11 



4 



PEAL > 





So sweet a face, such angel grace. 
In all that land had never been ; 




Cophetua sware a royal oath, 




One her dark hair and lovesome mien. | "This beggar-maid shall be my queen 

D 



50 



NASrS ALMANAC FOE 1872. 



YE TRUE HTSTORIE OF 




NCE upon a time there lived a little girl who had such a sweet 
temper that she seemed to be made of sugar and spice, like 
the little girl in the nursery rhyme. Her mother was very 
fond of her, and, in order to set off her beauty, made her a 
hood out of an old red flannel petticoat, in which she looked 
very pretty, and all the neighbors, in admiration, called her 
IJttle Red-Riding-Ilood. Now, although she was a very good 
girl, her school-fellows said that Little Ked-Riding-Hood had 
one very naughty little fault, which no girl, little or big, ever 
had before in any age of the world : she was vain — ^just a lit- 
tle vain. They even whispered that she had been known to 
tie two old brass ear-rings to her ears with bits of cotton, 
pretending that her ears had been realh/ pierced ; and that 
more than once she had made up her dress into an unseemly 
bunch behind, pretending to have a Grecian bend ! One day 
her mother called to her as she came home from school, and 
said, " I've been making some cheese-cakes and dough-nuts 
to-day, and, as I'm afraid your grandmother is ill, you sliall 
take her some of those very digestible articles." She then stuck the bright red hood 
upon the back of her little girl's head, giving her a big basket full of cakes, and a lec- 
ture on the vanity of wearing gaudy colors. Now Little Hed-liiding-Hood had a won- 




NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



51 



>x^'^^mMM> 




derful little lamb. He did not know how to spell as well as his young mistress, but 
that he Avas a clever critic any one could see, for whenever she read the intellectual 
stories out of her spelling-book, he showed his discernment by crying "Bah I bah!" 
He imitated his mistress, and was a vain little lamb. So, when Little Red-Kiding- 
Hood had set out with her cakes, he looked about for some finery for himself, and 
finding a wolf's skin hanging up in the wardrobe (where, of course, such things al- 
ways are), he put it on, and concluded that he looked best of all the lambs— 6a-ing 
none ! On the way to her grandmother's, as Little Red-Riding-Hood was trudging 
along, thinking how nice it must be to be an old lady and ill Avith such a big basket of 
cakes as medicine, the little lamb overtook her, looking for all the world like a great 
ugly Avolf. When she saw this horrible sight, thinking it was a real wolf come to 
gobble up herself and the cakes, she tried to hide her face in the soft part of the stem 
of a tree, concluding very logically that, if she couldn't see the wolf, he couldn't see her. 
Having Avaited in this position for tAvo seconds, expecting every moment to hear the 
Avolf give his Avell knoAvn and terrible roar, her patience was naturally exhausted, and 



52 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




she turned round fully prepared to scream to any extent. The lamb, upon this, over- 
joyed at what he thought a recognition, for he thought she had "cut him dead," was 
so agitated that he could not open his mouth, and so, instead of expressing his feel- 
ing vocally, he kicked up his heels, and away he went — a merry somersault before the 
astonished eyes of the little maid. When Little Ked-Riding-IIood saw this strange 
freak of the terrible beast, she was terribly frightened, and, seeing a street-car passing, 
she concluded it would be better and cheaper to ride, and certainly more pleasant to 
run the chance of being " taken in" at the hands of a conductor than to be taken in by 
the jaws of a wolf. 

The lamb, however, knowing the geographical fact that two miles by car take just as 
long as four by foot, resolved to take a nearer way, and get to the old lady's house be- 
fore Ilcd-Kiding-lIood. He set oft' at full speed, the wolf's head hanging over his 
slioulder, never heeding whom he might run over in his flight, for he was as careless of 
other people's comfort and lives as any New York driver. Unfortunntely, the ass of 
the neighborhood had convened a meeting of the beasts for the purpose of discussing 
flieir common rights, and to it he had specially invited the goose, the pig, and other 
intellectual anim:\Is. Tiiey hud met in a nice little spot in the middle of a wood, nair 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



58 







a pool of water, which they thought very convenient, as it would serve to liquef)' the 
eloquence of the speaker who was longest on his legs (probably the giraffe, should he 
be present), and it might also be an inducement to the duck, who they feared would 
make some excuse for not attending, and whose presence they particularly wanted, as 
she was the editor of a weekly paper which in the most delightful way propounded wild 
theories — (for the duck was a "wild" one) — about female suffrage, and, at the same 
time, preached in the most agreeable way the stupidest blasphemy. The goose, who 
contributed to the "Daily Cackler," brought his wife, whose delightful little book, 
entitled "The Way to shell-out,'' is universally used as a class-book in all schools of 
chickens, goslings, and young oysters. Mr. Bull had come all the way from Oxford on 
purpose to attend the meeting ; and the hare, the frog, and many other animals, were 
also present, as well as a very fair gathering of birds. The most extraordinary animal 
who was there was a rough, wicked-looking school-boy, and no one suspected his pres- 
ence, for he was hidden behind a tree. This unfortunate youth had a strong and un- 
common propensity for applying his tongue to candy and other sweet-stuffs, and his 
school-master, a most generous and sweet-tempered man, finding him that morning in 
the very act of committing this dreadful offense, had promised him a "licking" of an- 
other sort. The boy, whose parents were very proud of his high spirit — which spirit he 
showed chiefly by pinching his little sister, running pins through the tails of cockroaches, 





/>4 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 







and annoying every other human being — knowing how vast a difference there is between 
licking and being licked, resolved, like the highly respectable cashier of the Diddleyou 
Hank, to abscond before accounts were balanced. Accordingly, considering justly that 
it was more pleasant to be hiding of his own will among the trees than to receive a 
hiding at the master's will in school, he went on a botanizing expedition into the very 
wood where the congress of beasts was Assembled in earnest discussion ; the ass, who was 
chairman, was braying loudly ; the pig grunted acquiescence ; the goose was applaud- 
ing; and the ox, on the opposition side, was humming a low tune in defiance, while 
the boy behind the tree, with a pebble-stone in his hand, prepared to let fly among 
them. The debate increased in interest, and the noise caused by a discussion between 
tlie ass and the owl (who acted as reporter), concerning a ^«r<'-brained remark from 
one of the smaller beasts, was almost as great as that caused sometimes by human con- 
gresses, while their language was certainly of a higher and more intelligible order. 
How it all might have ended no one could tell, for at this unfortunate moment the lamb 
m wolf's clothing came tumbling in, and dissolved the beastly congress before they 
had passed a single act. Not knowing that it was the "season for land)," the mem- 
bers, of course, were unprepared to offer any resiotance. With unblushing haste the 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



55 




disturber of the peace pursued his way and arrived at the old lady's cottage. Too 
much agitated by his feelings, he did not wait to knock, but turned his heels to the door 
and began to kick in style. The old lady was lying in bed, surrounded by bottles and 
dishes containing physic and other delicacies, and attended by her favorite cat. She 
(I mean the old lady, not the cat) had once been a beauty, but, of course, as she told 
little girls, she was never vain ; and now in her old age she innocentl}^ spent her time 
in considering by-gone fashions, and sorrowing that she could not use them still. Just 
as the lamb arrived she had taken up an old volume of the Anglo-Saxon pei-iod, called 
Harper s Bazar, to which St. Dunstan used to contribute fancy patterns, and was pi- 
ously thinking of the mutability of all earthly things — especially fashions ! Upon hear- 
ing the horrible noise outside, the paper dropped from her hands, and her companion 
arched his back as if expecting a catastrophe. Meanwhile the lamb, whose garment 
did not fit well, and who looked in the midst of his exertions like a twofold and many- 
legged monster, finding kicking of no avail, determined to try the soft-soap dodge, and 
began gently to pat at the door. Keassured by this Christian-like sound, the dame in- 



56 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 





structed her attendant to open the door, and Tom, who, with the exception of a white 
tie, looked as solemn as any flunky, immediately raised the latch with the greatest 
gravity. In rushed the disguised lamb, with a most awful countenance. The old lady 
looked at him through her goggles for a moment, and then fled with a terrific yell, her 
cat following suit. The lamb, innocently thinking to salute her, had leaped to the bed, 
upsetting in his haste the physic bottles, dishes, and all ; but, seeing the door shut be- 
hind the old lady, he thought to wind up his day's fun by playing a trick upon his mis- 
tress. He first arrayed himself in the old lady's cap and goggles, glancing in the glass 
with great satisfaction ; and then, having fortified himself with a draught from the only 
unbroken medicine bottle, which was very properly labeled "Bourbon — Poison," he laid 
down in the bed, hiding all but the cap beneath the clothes. Soon after this Little 
Red-Riding-Hood knocked at the door. "Come in," said the lamb, but in such a tone 
that the little girl thought her grandmother must have made herself ill with too much 
" physic I" She entered, however, and went up to the bed as usual to kiss the old lady. 
The lamb pulled down the clothes, disclosing a wolf's head surrounded by a night-cap. 




_- 1 ^ H lTD 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



57 




Little Red-Riding-Hood screamed, and would have gone into hysterics, only she Avas too 
young to know that that was the proper thing to do. As it was, she ran away, utter- 
ing the most piteous screams. At the door, however, she tumbled over her grand- 
mother, who had now mustered up her courage, and was returning, armed with her best 
silver goggles, and protected by Little-toes, her grandchild, and Tom — her only gentle- 
man friend. The three returned to the scene of the ti'agedy, and there found the ter- 
rible wolf transformed into the meekest of lambs, his wolf's skin (to which an extraor- 
dinary tail was attached) remaining in the bed. Little Red-Riding-Hood, in imitation 
of her grandmother, began to lecture the lamb on his absurd vanity, which had been 
the cause of so much trouble and loss, for she had left her cakes in the car ; but the old 
lady, whose spirits had now returned, embraced them all, whereupon the four-footed au- 
thor of all this confusion repented of his evil deeds, became quite a reformed character, 
and, in proof thereof and of his patriotism, he shed his blood a few months after, if not 
for the good of his country, at least for the good of his friends. — Alfred Mills. 




58 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 

MY MOTHER. 







A helpless babe, who nursed me then, 
And gave me paregoric when 
I wept with pain, till well again ? 

My Mother. 




And when her precious infant smiled, 
Who called me "angel," "darling child," 
And laughed and wept in transport wild ? 

My Mother. 




And when the colic vexed me sore, 
Who then at midniglit walked the floor. 
And ill her arms her baby bore? 

My Mother. 




Who let me do just what I chose, 
And dressed me up in fancy clothes, 
And taught me how to wipe my nose ? 

Mv Mother 




And watched me still with anxious care, 
And washed my face, and curled my hair, 
And set me in my little chair ? 

My Mother. 




And who my youthful body bent 
Across her knee — oh, sad event ! — 
And spanked me to her lieart's content ? 

My Mother. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



59 




And when I cut my finger, who 
Brought salve to soothe and cure it too. 
And checked my juvenile boo-hoo? 

My Mother. 




And when at school I made my war, 
Who heard my lessons day by day, 
Of Puget Sound and Baffin's Bay ? 

^ My Mother, 




<^vV 



And when my pony just in play 
Ran off, and carried me away, 
Who viewed the scene with great dismay ? 

Mv Mother. 




And when he kicked with all his might, 
And threw me higher than a kite, 
Who fainted and fell down with flight ? 

My Mother. 




Who gently said it was not right 
To set the dog and cat to fight, 
Or laugh at such a wicked sight ? 

My Mother. 




Though she is old and all alone, 
And I to be a man have grown, 
Who calls me still her boy — her own ? 

My Mother. 
*G. P. W. 



60 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 




RATES OF POSTAGE. 

DOMESTIC. 

The Postage ox Letters within the United 
States and Territories is 3 cents for every letter 
or sealed package weighing one half ounce or 
nnder, and '6 cents for every additional half ounce 
or fi-action thereof. Prepayment, with stamps, 
is required. City letters must be prepaid 2 cents 
for every half ounce. 

Transient Matter, embracing pamphlets, 
occasional publications, transient newspapers, 
hand-bills, posters, book manuscript, proof-sheets 
(corrected or not), maps, prints, engravings, 
sheet-music, blanks, flexible patterns, samples, 
sample cards, phonographic paper, letter enve- 
lopes, postal envelope^', ])ostal envelopes or wrap- 
pers, cards and jjaper (plain or ornamental), 
photographic representations of different types, 
seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, and scions, postage 
to be prepaid, is, on one package to one address, 
not over four ounces, 2 cents, and 2 cents for 
every additional four ounces or fraction thereof. 
The weight of packages of seeds, cuttings, roots, 
and scions is limited to thirty-two ounces. 

All mail matter not sent at letter postage, except seeds, must be wrapped or enveloped 
with open sides or ends, otherwise it must be rated with letter postage. No communi- 
cation, in writing or print, can be sent with seeds, roots, cutting^ or scions, maps, en- 
gravings, or other matter not printed, except upon the separate payment of postage upon 
each separate matter at the established rates. 

No articles of glass, or contained in glass, can be placed in the mails ; and all liquids, 
poisons, chemicals, etc., likely to injure their contents, or the person of any officer of the 
post-office, are positively excluded. 

Photographs on cards, paper, and other flexible material (not in cases), can be sent 
at the same rate as miscellaneous printed matter, ^-iz., 2 cents for each four ounces or 
fraction thereof. 

Books. — Postage on books, not exceeding four ounces in weight, 4 cents ; on each 
additional four ounces or fraction thereof, 4 cents. 

Newspaper Postage. — On Daily Papers to subscribers, when prepaid quarterly or 
yearly in advance, either at the mailing office or office of delivery, per quarter (3 months), 
35 cents ; six times per week, per quarter, 30 cents ; for tri- Weekly, per quarter, 15 cents ; 
for semi-Weekly, per quarter, 10 cents ; for Weekly, per quarter, 5 cents. 

Weekly Newspapers (one copy only) sent by the publisher to actual subscribers 
within the county where printed and published, /ree. 

Postage per Quarter (to be paid (juarterly or yearly in advance) on newspapers and 
periodicals issued less frequentb) than once a week, sent to actual subscribers in any part 
of tiie United States : Semi-monthly, not over four ounces, G cents ; over four ounces 
and- not over eight ounces, 12 cents ; over eight ounces and not over twelve ounces, IS 
cents. Monthly, not over four ounces, 3 cents; over four ounces and not over eigiit 
ounces, (> cents; over eight ounces and not over twelve ounces, 1) cents. Quarterly, not 
over four ounces, 1 cent ; over four ounces and not over eight ounces, 2 cents ; over 
eiglit ounces and not over twelve ounces,J^ cents. 

To Canada. — Postage on all printed matter can only be prepaid to the Canada line. 
Unsealed Circulars — not exceeding three in nunii)er. to one address, 2 cents. 
Money Orders are issued in sums of not more than fifty dollars. Larger amounts 
can be sent to the snme ])erson by additional orders, 

ItATES. — On orders not exceeding ifi>20, 10 cents; on orders over !5«20 and not ex- 
ceeding $30, 15 cents ; on orders over $'M) and not exceeding ifi-tO, 20 cents ; on orders 
over $40 and not exceeding $50, 25 cents. 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



Gl 



Rates to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. — On orders not exceeding $10, 25 
cents ; over $10 and not exceeding $20, 50 cents ; over $20 and not exceeding $30, 75 cents ; over 
$30 and not exceeding $40, $1 ; over $40 and not exceeding $50, $1 25. 

Money can be sent between the United States and Switzerland at same rates as on 
domestic orders. 

Hates of Charge for Exchangk (to be deducted by the postmaster at New York 
from the value in United States gold of international order on Switzerland) : On orders 
not exceeding $20, 20 cents, gold ; on orders over $20 and not exceeding $80, 30 cents, 
gold ; on orders over $30 and not exceeding $40, 40 cents, gold ; on orders over $40 
and not exceeding $50, 50 cents, gold. 

Request Letters, and letters bearing the name and address of the writer on the 
outside, when not delivered within the time specified, are returned direct, without being 
sent to the Dead Letter Office. They are not advertised. 

Advertised Letters. — All letters remaining in the office are advertised on Tuesday 
and Friday of each week. If not claimed in one month thereafter they are sent to 
Washington, City letters are not advertised unless prepaid by a 3-cent stamp. 

Forwarding Letters Free. — Prepaid and free letters are forwarded at the request 
of party addressed from one post-office to another without additional postage. A letter 
delivered by the post-office to an authorized person, and by him redirected to another 
post-office, can not be forw^arded to its new address without the prepayment of postage. 
Drop letters can be so forwarded, but are charged 3 cents for each half ounce or frac- 
tion thereof. These provisions do not apply to any mail matter except letters. 

Registered Letters. — Letters may be registered by paying postage in full, and a 
registration fee, in stamps, for the United States, 15 cents. 

Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, 5 cents. 

West Indies, Island of Jamaica, and Panama, 8 cents. 

Burmah, China, East Indies, Siam, and Japan, 17 cents. 

Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, Constantinople, East Indies, Falkland Islands, Gambia, 
Gibraltar, Gold Coast, Hong Kong, Java, Lagos, Labaun, Liberia, Malta, Mauritius, Na- 
tal, New South Wales, Queensland, St. Helena, Sierra Leone, South Austi'alia, Tasmania, 
Victoria, and Westerfi Australia, 16 cents, 

Egypt (Alexandria, Cairo, and Suez only), 8 cents. 

Great Britain and Ireland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Switzerland, and the North 
German Union (including all the countries and places reached via the North German 
Mails, except Alexandretta, Latakia, Mersina, Retimo, and Tripoli, in Turkey), 8 cents. 

Registered letters must always be indorsed on the back with the name and address of 
the wniter, and should be deposited fifteen minutes prior to closing the mails. 

FOREIGN. 

[The * indicates that unless the letters are registered, prepayment is optional ; in all other cases it is required.] 



From the United States to 



go 






Bkitish Provinces. — Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Sco- 
tia (if unpaid, 10 cents) *6 

Newfoundland. — (If over 3000 miles, 15 cents) | 10 

Vancouver's Island. — (If unpaid, 10 cents) *6 



Europe. 

Great Britain and Ireland 

[Rates on book-packets, patterns, and samples, prepayment com- 
pulsory — Not over 1 oz., 2 cents; over 1 oz. and not over 2 oz., 4 
cents ; over 2 oz. and not over 4 oz., 6 cents ; 6 cents for each 4 
ounces or fraction thereof.] 

Denmark, via North German Union direct 

Denmark, closed mail, via England 

Sweden, via North German Union direct ' 

Sweden, closed mail, via England 

[Small newspapers under 2 oz., 7 cents each, by closed mail, via En- 
gland.] 

Norway, via North German Union direct 

Norway, closed mail, via England ._ 

[Small newspapers under 2 oz., 7 cents each, closed mail, via En- 
gland.] 

Russia, direct mail 



*10 
*13 
*11 
*14 



n2 



2 


t 


2 


V 


2 


t 


2 


§ 


6 


P 


7 


F 


8 


G 


9 


G 


8 


G 


9 


G 


5 


D 



ioz, 



S 
8 



62 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



FOREIGN POSTAGE.— Con«7i««d. 



Fkom the United States to 



Russia, closed mail, via England 

Belgium, or the Netherlands 

Prussia and North German Union, including all the German States, 
Austria and Hungary, direct mail, via Bremen and Hamburg 

North German Union, closed mail, via England 

Italy, direct, closed mail, via England 

Italy, North German Union, direct 

Italy, North German Union, closed mail, via England 

France, open mail, via England 

France, direct mail 

Switzerland, direct, closed mail, via England 

Spain. — Letter rates to Spain and the Canary Islands, via Marseilles, 
are as follows : If not over X oz., 16 cents ; over X oz. and not over 
^ oz., 28 cents ; over }4 oz. aud uot over ?i oz., 32 cents ; over % oz. 
and not over 1 oz., 44 cents. 

Portugal, via England 

Gibraltar, " 

Malta, " 

Greece, via North German Union, direct 

Greece, closed mail, via England 

[Small newspapers, under 2 oz., 8 cents each, via closed mail, via 
England.] 

Moldavia and Wallachia, including Bakeu, Berlat, Botntschany, Bu- 
charest, Fokshan, Galatz, Gergeuo, Jassy, Ibraila, Piatra, Plojeshti, 
Roumania, via North German Union, direct 

Moldavia and Wallachia, closed mail, via England 

Turkey (European and Asiatic). — Letters for Adrianople, Autwari, 
Beyrout, Burgas, Caiffa, Cavallo, Caudia, Canea, Constantinople, 
Czernarrods, Dardanelles, Durazzo, Gallipoli, Jaffa, Janina, Jerusa- 
lem, Ineboli, Kustendji, Lagos, Larnica, Mitylene, Philipopolis, Pre- 
vesa, Quaranti, Rhodes, Rustchuck. Salonica, Samsoun, Seres, San- 
ti, Siuope, Smyrna, Sophia, Sulina, Tenedos, Trebizond, Tchesme, 
Tultcha, Valona, Varna. Vola, and Widdin, via North German Union, 
direct • 

Turkey (European and Asiatic), closed mail, via England 

All other points in Turkey (European and Asiatic), via North German 
Union, direct. (No registration to Alexandretta, Latakia, Mersiua, 
Retime, or Tripoli, North German Union and Briudisi) 

Closed mail, via England 



£ S 



*15 
*10 

•T 
•10 
*10 
*11 
*14 
*4 
10 
*10 



16 

10 
16 

*15 
*18 



*10 
*13 



B 
B 
B 
H 
H 



8| 
8J 



8 



SUPPLEMENTARY TABLE. 



This Table tfiows rates not mentioned in the above Table, re/erred to by 
letters B, C, etc. 



B— via 
B— via 
C — via 
C— via 
D— via 
D— via 
E— via 
E— via 
F— via 
F— via 
Q — via 
G— via 
n-via 
H-via 
V—. . . , 



Southampton 

Marseilles 

North German Union direct : 

North (ierman Union, dosed mail, via England. 

North German Union direct 

North German Vuion, closed «iaz7, via England. 

North German Union direct 

North German Union, closed viail, via England . 
North German Union direct 



Cts. 
4 
4 
2 
3 
4 
5 
5 
6 
6 



North German Union, closed mail, via England .... I 7 

North German Union direct 

North German Union, closed viail, via England 

North German Union direct 

North German I uion, closed viail, vift England 



o " 

CU. 

8 

8 

4 

G 

6 

8 

7 

9 

8 

10 

9 

11 

16 

12 

3 



Cts. 

12 

14 

6 

8 

8 

10 

9 

11 

10 

12 

11 

13 

12 

14 

4 



t To Relcium, t)ie Netherlands, Nortli OirmRn Union, or vin tlie North (•prninn Union to countries beyond, and to Ilnly 
and Switzerland, the |mHtii);K increiisi-H a Binirle rate for every four ounces. 

1 Domestic rates t* and from the United States lioundary-lines. 

i Not over one ounce, 'J cents ; not over two ounces, 4 ceiita ; not over four ounces, 6 cents ; and 6 cents for onch four ounces 
or fraction of an ounce. 



NAST'S ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



63 



Distance round the Globe, 25,000 miles. 
Air-line Distances from Washington to various Parts of the World. 




MILES. I 

Auckland,N.Zeal'd S160 
Belize, Cent. Amer. 1410 
Berlin, Germany. . . 3840 
Berne, Switzerland 3720 
Bremen, Germany. 3500 
Buenos Ayres,A.R. 4870 
Calcutta, India.... 85S0 
C. of G'd Hope, Af. 7380 
Cape Horn, S. A. . . 6450 

Caraccas, Ven 1S30 

Charlottet'u,P.E.I. 835 
Chiquisaca, Bolivia 3670^ 
Coustantinople, 

Turkey 4S70 

Dublin, Ireland.... 3030 
Edinburg, Scotl'd . 3120 
Frankfort, Germ'y. 3700 
Frederickton,N.B. 665 
Georget'u,Br.Gua. 2230 

Halifax, N. S 750 

Hamburg, Germ'y. 3570 

Havana, Cuba 1790 

Honolulu,Saud.Isl. 4650 

Jerusalem,Pal 5490 

Kingston, C.W. ... 365 



MILES. 

Lima, Peru 3180 

Lisbon, Portugal . . 31S0 
London,England.. 3300 
Mexico, Mexico . . . 1680 

Montreal, C.E 465 

Nicaragua, C.Am. . 1740 
Panama, N. Gran.. 1840 

Paris, France 34S0 

Pekin, China 7680 

Quebec, C.E 590 

RiodeJaueiro,Bra. 4300 

Rome, Italv 4080 

Santiago, Chile.... 4700 
St.Dominuo, St.D. 4300 

St.Johu,N.F 1230 

St. Juan, P.Rico... 4380 
St. Salvador,C.Am. 1650 
St. Petersburg, 

Russia 4290 

Spanishtown, Jam. 4290 
Sydney, Australia. 9150 
Tehuautepec, Mex. 1620 

Toronto, C.W 360 

Vera Cruz, Mexico 1560 
Vienna, Germany.. 4110 



I'ro7n NeiB Torlc City to 



MILES. I MILES. I MILES. MILES. 

Adrian, Mich 775 Chilicothe, 645 Lafayette, Ind 903 ; Quincy, 111 1176 

Akron, 610 Cincinnati, 744 Lansing, Mich 7S5lRacine, Wi« 976 

Albany, N.Y 154 Circleville, 640 Lawrence,Mass. . . . 262|Rahway,N. J 20 

Alexandria, Va 238 Cleveland, 581 Leavenworth, Kan. 1393 1 Raleigh, N. C 669 

Algier8,La 1551 ! Columbia, S. C 744 Lexington, Ky 840 i Reading, Pa 128 



AUeo-hany, Pa 434, Columbus, 624|Lexington, Mt) 1554 

Alleutown, Pa 92;Concord, N. H 308 Little Rock^ Ark. . . 1430 

Alliance 515 Corning, N.Y 291 

Alton, 111 1060 Covingtou, Ky 745 

Annapolis,Md 222 Cumberland, Md. . . 364 

Ann Arbor, Mich. . 716 Danville, Va 497 

Atchison, Kan 1368 Davenport, Iowa . . 1093 



Lockport, N.Y 507 

Louisville, Ky 900 

Lowell, Mass 261 

Lynchburg, Va 404 

Lynn, Mass 247 



Atlanta, Ga 1018 Dayton, 804 Macon, Ga 1121 



246 



Auburn, N.Y 328 Dedham, Mass. 

Augusta, Me 4071 Denver City, Col. . . 1980 

Augusta, Ga 887iDes Moines, Iowa. 1251 

Aurora, 111 951 Detroit, Mich 679 

Baltimore 188 Dover, N. H 

Bangor, Me 482 Dubuque, Iowa 1100 

Bath, Me 382 Dunkirk, N. Y' 460 

Baton Rouge, La. . 1320 Easton, Pa 75 

Belfast, Me. ...:.. . 424 Elmira, N.Y 274 

Bellefontaine, O. . . 658 Elizabeth, N. J 15 



Madison, Ind S50 



Binghampton,N.Y. 

Blackstone, Mass. . 272 Evansville, Ind 

Bloomington,Ill... 1037 Fall River, Mass. 

Boston, Mass 236 Fitchburg, Mass. 

Bridgeport, Conn.. 59 Fort Kearuy,Neb 

Bristol, R. 1 215:Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Bucyrus, 632 Fredericksb'rg, Va. 



Madison, Wis 1049 

Memphis, Tenn 1289 

Meriden, Conn 94 

304 Milledgeville, Ga. . 1160 
Milwaukee, Wis.... 996 

Mobile, Ala 1379 

Montgomery, Ala. . 1193 
Montpellier, Vt. . . . 454 
Nashua, N.H 275 



215 Erie, Pa 508 1 Nashville, Teun. ... 1085 



Richmond, Va 356 

Rochester, N.Y.... 451 
Rock Island, 111. .. 1093 

Rome, N.Y 264 

Roxbury, Mass. ... 238 
Sacramento, Cal. . . 2900 

Saco, Me 324 

St. Joseph, Mo 1385 

St. Louis, Mo 1084 

St. Paul, Minn 1441 

Salem, Mass 252 

Salt Lake City .... 2410 
San Francisco, Cal. 3300 

Sandusky, 642 

Savannah, Ga 974 

Scranton, Pa 142 

Springfield, 111 1062 

Springfield, Mass. . 138 

Springfield, 828 

Stratford, Conn. ... 37 

Staunton, Va 486 

Steubenville, O. . . . 474 
Stonington, Conn.. 143 

Syracuse, N.Y 302 

272 i Taunton, Mass 210 

76 Tallahassee, Fla. . . 1190 



903 

9 

181 

32 



1021iNew Albany, Ind. 

180 Newark, N. J 

286 NewBedford,Mass. 
1598 N. Brunswick, N. J. 

763Newburg,N.Y' 53 

296 Newburyp't, Mass.. 

Buffalo, N.Y 433!Freeport, 111..". 1032 New Haven, Conn. 

Burlington, N. J. . . 74 Galena, 111 1083 New Orleans, La. . . 1550lTerre Haute, Ind. . 912 

Burlington, Iowa.. 1122 Galesburg, 111 1076 Newport, Ky 744 Toledo, 742 

Burlington, Vt 280 Galveston, Texas.. 1900 Newport, R. 1 162 Tonawanda, N. Y.. 463 

Cambridge, Mass. . 239 Georgetown, D.C.. 228 Norwalk, Conn. .. . 45iTrenton,N. J 58 

Camden, N.J 91 Hamilton, 766 Omaha, Neb 1455!Troy, N. Y 144 

Canandaigua, N.Y. 377 Harrisbnrg, Pa 182 Oswego, N. Y 237iUtica, N. Y 249 

Carson City, Nev. . 2800 Hartford, Conn 112 Paterson, N. J 17 Vicksburg, Miss. . . 1542 

Cedar Falls, Iowa . 1186 Hoboken, N. J 2 Pekin, 111 1082 Washington, D. C. . 230 

Charabersburg, Pa. 246 Indianapolis, Ind. . 838 Peoria, 111 1072 Wheeling, W.Va. . . 522 

" " ' ' 874 Jackson, Miss 1498 Petersburg, Va 378 Wilmington, Del... 116 

235 Jefferson City, Mo. 1210 Philadelphia, Pa. . . 88 Wilmington, N. C. 734 

980 Jersey City, N. J. . . 1 Pittsburg, Pa 431 Worcester, Mass. . . 192 

Chelsea,Mas8 240 Kalamazoo, Mich. . 822 Poitland, Me 344 Zanesville, 600 

Chicago, 111 911 Knoxville, Tenn... 868 Providence, R. I. . . 1931 



Charleston, S. C. 
Charlestown, Mass. 
Chattanooga,Tenn. 



6i 



NASrS ALMANAC FOR 1872. 



Distances h/ Water from New TorJc to 



Amsterdam 

Baltimore 

Barbadoes 

Batavia 

Bermudas 

Bombay 

Bordeaux 

Boston 

Botany Bay 

Buenos Ayres . . . 

Calcutta 

Canton 

Cape Horn 

" Good Hope 



MILES. ) MILES. I 

3,510'Chagre8 2,308| 

465 Charleston 750 

1,906 Columbia River . 15,065 

13,066 Constantinople . . 5,140 

660 Copenhagen 3,640 

11,574 Dublin 3,225 

3,310 Gibraltar 3,300 

310 Halifax 612 

13,294| Hamburg 3,775 

7,110 Havana 1,420 

12,425 'Havre 3,210 

13,900i Kingston 1,640 

8,115!Lima 11,310 

6,83fllLisbon 3,175 



Liverpool 3,210 

Loudon 3,375 

Madras 11,850 

Malta 4,325 

Manilla 13,675 

Mon rovia 3,825 

Naples 4,330 

New Orleans 2,045 

Panama 2,358 

Pekin 15,325 

Pernambuco 4,760 

Philadelphia 240 

Quebec 1,400 



Rio Janeiro 

Sandwich Islands 
San Francisco. .. 
St. Petersburg . . . 

Singapore ... 

Smyrna 

Stockholm 

Tahiti 

Trieste 

Valparaiso 

Vera Cruz 

Victoria 

Washington 



3,840 

15.300 
5,858 
4.420 

12,710 
5,000 
4.05(1 

12/225 
5,130 
!',75y 
2,260 

12.825 
400 



A Table exhibiting the difference of Time between Washington and the places named. 
When the clock is 12, noon, at Washington, it is at 



Philadelphia 12.07 P.M., San Francisco, Cal 

Baltimore 12.01 " " 

Wilmington, Del. . . . 12.05 " 

Jersey City, N. J 12.11 " 

New York City 12.11 " 

Springfield, Mass. . . . 12.18 " 

Newport, R.I 12.27 " 

Hartford, Conn 12.17 " 

Burlington, Vt 12.15 " 

Portsmouth,N. H. . . . 12.25 " 

Bangor, Me 12.33 " 

Norfolk, Va. 12.03 *' 

Augusta,Me 12.29 " 

Concord, N.H 12.22 " 

Montpellier,Vt 12.18 " 

New Haven, Conn. . . 12. 17 " 

Providence, R. 1 12.22 " 

Boston, Mass 12.24 " 

Albany, N.Y 12.13 " 

Trenton, N.J 12.09 " 

Dover, Del 12.06 " 

Annapolis, Md 12.02 " 

Harrisburg, Pa 12.01 " 

Quebec, C.E 12.23 " 

Kingston, C.W 12.02 " 

Montreal, C.E 12.11 " 

Wilmington, N.C.... 11.56 A.M. 

Charleston, S. C 11.48 " 

Savannah, Ga 11.44 " 

St. Augustine, Fla. . . 11.42 " 

Mobile, Ala 11.16 " 

Vicksburg, Mi.ss 11.04 " 

New Orleans, La 11 .07 " 

Knoxviile, Tenn 11 .33 " 

Memphis, Tenn 11.08 " 

Louisville, Ky 11.25 " 

Cleveland, 11.40 " 

Fort Wayne, Ind. ...11.28 " 

Chicago, 111 11.17 " 

St. Louis, Mo 11.08 " 

Iowa City, Iowa 11.02 " 

Galveston, Texas.... 10.49 " 

Corpus Christi,Tex.. 10.38 " 

Salt Lake City,Utah. 9.40 " 



8.58 A.M. 

Portland, Oregon 8.57 " 

Ft.Wallawalla,W.T. 9.16 " 

Fort Kearnv, Neb. . . 10.31 " 

Pike's Peak, Kan. ...10.08 " 

Jauesville,Wi8 11.12 " 

Milwaukee, Wis 11.16 " 

Detroit, Mich 11.36 " 

Lansing, Mich 11.30 " 

Madison, Wis 11.12 " 

St. Paul, Minn 10.55 " 

Lecompton, Kan. ... 10.46 " 

Omaha, Neb 10.44 " 

01ympia,W. T 9.57 " 

Salem, Oregon 9.56 " 

Sacramento, Cal 9.02 " 

Fillmore City. Utah. 9.39 " 

SautaFe, N. M 10.04 " 

Austin, Texas 10.37 " 

Des Moines, Iowa. .. 10.53 " 

Jefferson Citv, Mo. . . 10 . 59 " 

Springfield, 111 11.09 " 

Indianapolis, Ind — 11.24 " 

Columbus, 11.36 " 

Frankfort, Kv 11.29 " 

Nashville, Tenn 11.21 " 

Little Rock, Ark 10.59 " 

Baton Rouge, La 11.03 " 

Jackson, Miss 11.07 " 

Montgomery, Ala 11.24 " 

Tallahassee, Fla 11.31 " 

Milledgeville,Ga. ... 11.35 " 

Columbia, S. C 11.44 '• 

Raleigh, N.C 11.54 " 

Richraond,Va 11.58 " 

Buftalo, N.Y 11.52 " 

Rochester, N.Y 11.58 " 

Charlottet'n.P. E.L. 12.55 P.M. 

Portland, Me 12.27 " 

St. John's, N.B 1.36 " 

Halifax, N.S 12.54 " 

Augusta, Ga 11 .40 A.M, 

Natchez, Miss 11.03 



Cincinnati, 11.30 A.M. 

Quincy,Ill 11.02 " 

Toronto, C.W 11.50 " 

SiouxFallsCity, Dae. 10.42 " 

Ottawa, C.W 12.05 P.M. 

Sault St. Mary, Mich. 11.31A.M. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 11.48 " 

London, England.... 5.08 P.M. 
Edinburg, Scotland.. 4.56 " 

Lisbon, Portugal 4.32 " 

Honolulu, Sandw.Isl. 6.36A.M. 
Sydney, Australia... 3.13 " 

Pekin, China 12.54 P.M. 

FrankfortjGermany. 5.43 " 
Berne, Switzerland.. 5.38 " 

Rome, Italv 5.58 " 

Berlin, Prussia 6.02 '♦ 

Cape of Good Hope. 6.22 " 
St. Petersburg, Russ. 7.10 " 
Jerusalem, Palestine 1.29 " 

Calcutta, India 11.02 " 

Constantinople, Tur. 7.04 " 

Vienna, Austria 6.14 " 

Paris, France 5.17 " 

Dublin, Ireland 4.43 " 

Mexico, Mexico 10.32 A.M. 

Vera Cruz, Mexico .. 10.43 " 
Belize, Cent. Amer. .11.15 " 
San Salvador, C. A... 11.11 " 

Nicaragua, C. A 11 .26 " 

Havana, Cuba 11.38 " 

Spanishtown, Jam... 12.00 M. 
St. Domingo, St. D. . . 12.29 P.M. 
San Juan, Porto Rico 12.44 " 
Rio de Janeiro, Braz. 2 . 14 " 

Cape Horn 12.40 '* 

Santiago, Chili 12.26 " 

Georgetown, Br. Gui. 1.16 " 
B.Ayres, Arg. Repub. 1.16 " 
Chiquisaca,Bolivia.. 12.12 " 

Lima, Peru 11.59 A.M. 

Caraccas, Venezuela. 12.40 P.M. 
Panama 11 .50 A.M. 



Frederickton, N. B. . 11.40 P.M. iTehuanlepec, Mex. .. 10.46 



Length of the Principal Rivers in the World. 



MILES. I MILKS. 

Missouri River (to the sea) . 4100 Amoor 2200 

Amazon 3(!00;St. Lawrence 2000 

Nile 3000, Cambodia 2000 

Mississippi 2s(i(ij Volga 2000 



Yang-lst'-kiang, Asia 2so(i 

Lena, Asia 2600 

Niger or Joliba, Africa 26o0 

Mackenzie 2.'>00 

Obe, Hoang Ho 2500 

Yeiuisci 2300 

Kio de la Plata 2250 



Murray (Ocana) 1900 

Rio Grande 1800 

Indus and Irrawaddy, each 17oo 
Nelson and S.iskatcliawan. 1600 

(ranges and Danube 16oo 

Orinoco and Bramapootra. 1500 
Euphrates 1400 



Mil KN. 

St. Francisco 1300 

Columbia and Senegal 12(Kt 

Colorado of Cal.,Totautins, 

and Araguay 1100 

Colorado, S. A., Don, Dnie- 
per, Orange 1008 

Rhine 950 

Anioor, Magdalepa, Parnai- 

ba, Sal wen 900 

Tigris,Nerbuddah, Meinam SCO 
Gambia, Dwina 7(K) 



THE NEW YORK AND TEXAS BEEF PRESERVING CO. 

Are now prepared to furnish to families their 
CANNED ROAST B££F, Al^ WHOLESALE AND EETAIL. 
This Beef is really more nutritions and more economical for family use than any ever offered 
for sale in any market, as the juices and srolatiu portions are all retained in the can. 

IT IS SOIilS MEAT, READY COOKED. 
Can contains no bone or gristle. Open the can, turn the contents into the saucepan, and when 
hot season to your taste and serve it upon the table as CARVED ROAST BEEP. 

Its cost is less than half of the price of Butcher's meat. It is hermetically sealed and will keep 
for years, just as good when opened as though cooked immediately. It is all alike, very tender. 
It is also very nice eaten cold. 

The chopped form makes excellent meat-balls, a superior hash, delicious salad, and is so much 
in request among mince-pie bakers as to have given it the name of "jr>je vieat." 

A great saving to Hotels and Families who have to prepare their CLEAR MEAT FOE 
MINCE PIES. 

Two and a half pounds of beef, when divested of bone and gristle, and cooked, make about one 
pound of this Clear Meat. 

Put up in Cases containing Two Dozen 3-lb. Cans, and in Cases containing Ten 7^-lb. Cans. 

Three-lb. CanSj 60 cents; T><j-lb. Cans, $1 35. Liberal discount to the trade. 
GEO. H. OTEUNROE, President and Pateutee, 16 Cedar St., New York City. 

THIS GREAT NATIONAL ILLUSTRATED 

RURAL AND FAMILY WEEKLY 

Is the Standard Authority on Agiu- 
oTTLTURE, HoRTictrLTUKE, &c., aud R favoritc 
liiterary and Family Journal. It 

is Ably Edited, Finely Illustrated, aud by far 
the Largest* Best, and Cheapest 

Journal of its Class in the Woiid. 

MOORE'S RURAL NEW-YORKER 

Has for over twenty years been the Leading and Most Popular Journal in its Sphere; but its Xeio 
Form, Superior Style, and Reduced Price for 1S72 will render it still more acceptable. Invaluable 
not only to Farmers, but to City, Village, or Suburban Cultivators of Fruits, Flowers, &c. ; and 
being a choice Family Paper, the Rural is the Favorite Farm and Fireside Weekly of America. 
Its Illustrations are numerous, varied, and beautiful. 

Terms, only $2 50 a Year; $2 00 in Clubs. 

Great Inducemeuts to Club Agents. Specimens. Premium Lists, Show-Bills. &c., pent free. 

Address I>. I>. T. MOORE, 5 Beekman St., Ne%v York. 





WEBER 



GEAND SQUARE 



UPRIGHT 

PIANO-FORTES. 

Indorseu bj the Lading Artists, Seminaries, and the Press, as the 

Best Pianos made. 

Including such names as 
Madame PAREPA-ROSA, Miss CLARA LOUISE KELLOGG, Miss ALIDA TOPP, 

S. B. MILLS, THEO. THOMAS, HARRY SANDERSON, 

JAMES M. WEHLI, GEO. F. BRISTOW, SIGNOR BRIGNOLI, 

De. WILLIAM feERGE, GEO. W. MORGAN, and every musician of note. 



Prices as reasonable, and terms as easy as consistent with thorough workmanship. 

WAREROOMS, • 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 16th St., N. Y. 



E 



PORTABILITY combined with GREAT TOWER 
iu 

FIELD, MARINE, TOURISTS', OPERA, 

and general Out-door Day and Night 

DOUBLE PERSPECTIVE GLASSES ; 

Catalogues seat free on receipt of 
3-cent stamp. 



Will show objects distinctly at from 
two to six miles. 

EYE-GLASSES A>'D SPECTACLES 

of the greatest transparent power, 
to strengthen and improve the sight 
without the distressing result of 
frequent changes. 




SEMMONS, 

OCULISTS' OPTICIAN, 
No, 687 Broadway, N. Y. 



"Usewashingtonmedallionpens." 



'«^ VI ^D O T A ^fP Thebloomofcarlywomanhoodisprcserved, and its attractive beauty 
r JCi A id A JaL S^ lieightened, by using DeVERXA-S PERSIAN SPRAY. It is the product ot 

Prof. DeVERNA's laboratory after lengthened and costly experiments, 

and it is confidentlv offered as incomparably the best face preparation. 

es. Tan. and all impurities of the skin are at 



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PUICES FOR CASH, DUKING THIS MONTU, Or wlIl take 

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NEW LIBRARY EDITIONS 

liT THE AUTHOR OF 

"JOHN HALIFAX:" 

olive.— ogilvies.— the head of the 
fa:mily.-joiin Halifax.— agatilvs 

HUSBAND. — HANNAH (In Press).— 

MISTRESS AND MAID (Iu Press).— 

WOMAN'S KINGDOM (In Press). 

12mo, Cloth, $1 50 per volume. 

For other Novels by this Author, see IlAurr.R's 
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02 

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o 
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The machine we this week bring before our readers is one which, in the accomphsh- 
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We have taken great pleasure in personally inspecting and operating this machine, 
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again. — Scientific American, New York, June 10, 1871. 



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Man and Wife. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, $1 50 ; Paper, $1 00. 

Moonstone. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, $2 00; Paper, $ I 50. 

No Name. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, $2 00; Paper, $1 50. 

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Queen of Hearts. ]2mo, Cloth, $L 50. 
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The Professor. By Currer Bell. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

Tenant of Vvlldfell Hall. By Acton Bell (Anna Bronte'). 12rao, Cloth, $1 50. * 

Wuthering Heights. Bv Ellis Bell (Emily Bronte'). 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 
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^yhat will He Do with It ? Svo, Paper, $1 50 ; Cloth, $2 00. 

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Godolphin. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

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Love Me Little, Love Me Long. Svo, Paper, 35 cents ; 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 
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Laird of Norlaw. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

Lucy Crofton. 12mo, Cloth, %\ 50. 

Perpetual Curate. 8vo, Cloth, $1 50 ; Paper, f 1 00. 

A Son of the Soil. 8vo, Cloth, $1 50 ; Paper, $1 00. 
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Live and Let Live. 1 8mo, Cloth, 75 cents. 

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Poor Rich Man and Rich Poor Man. 18mo, Cloth, 75 cents. 

Stories for Young Persons. 18mo, Cloth, 75 cents. 

Tales of Glauber Spa. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

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SHERWOOD'S (Mrs.) AVorks. Illustrations. 16 vols., 12mo, Cloth, %\ 50 per vol. 

Henry Milner. 2 vols., 12mo, Cloth, $3 00. 

Lady of the Manor. 4 vols., 12mo, Cloth, $6 00. 

Roxobel. 3 vols., 18mo, Cloth, $2 25. 
THACKERAY'S ( W. M. ) Novels : 

Vanity Fair. 32 Illustrations. 8vo, Paper, 50 cents, 

Pendennis. 179 Illustrations. 8vo, Paper, 75 cents. 

The Virginians. 150 Illustrations. 8vo, Paper, 75 cents. 

The Newcoraes. 162 Illustrations. 8vo, Paper, 75 cents. 

The Adventures of Philip. Portrait of Author and 64 Ill's. 8vo, Paper, 50 cents, 

Henry Esmond and Lovel the Widower. 32 Illustrations, 8vo, Paper, 50 cents. 
TOM BROWN'S School Days. By an Old Boy. Illustrations. 6vo, Paper, 50 cents. 
TOM BROWN at Oxford. Illustrations. 8yo, Paper, 75 cents. 
TROLLOPE'S (Anthony)* Bertrams. 12mo, Cloth, il»50. 

Can You Forgive Her ? 8vo, Cloth, $2 00 ; Paper, $1 50. 

Castle Richmond. 12mo, Cloth, %\ 50. 

Doctor Thome. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

Framley Parsonage. Illustrations. 12mo, Cloth, %\ 75. 

He Knew He was Right. 8vo, Cloth, $1 50 ; Paper, •$! 00. 

Last Chronicle of Barset. 8vo, Cloth, $2 00 ; Paper, $1 50. 

Phineas Finn. 8vo, Cloth, $1 75; Paper, $1 25. 

Orley Farm. Illustrations, 8vo, Cloth, f 2 00 ; Paper, %\ 50. 

Ralph the Heir. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, $1 75 ; Paper, $1 25. 

Small House at Allington. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, $2 00. 

Three Clerks. 12mo, Cloth, $1 50. 

Vicar of Bullhampton. Illustrations. 8vo, Cloth, %\ 75 ; Paper, $1 25. 
TROLLOPE'S (T. A.)* Lindisfarn Chase. 8vo, Cloth, $2 00 ; Paper, fl 50. 

* For other Novels by the same author, see Harper's Library of Select Novels. 



SCIENCE 



FOR THE YOUNG. 

By JACOB ABBOTT. 

lUillj 3lluBtration0. 



HEAT. i2mo, Cloth, 8i 50- {Ready) 

LIGHT. 1 2mo, Cloth, % i 50. {Ready) 

t 
WATER AND LAND. i2mo, Cloth, %\ 50. 

{Nearly Ready) 



Few men enjoy a wider or better earned popularity as a writer for the young than 
Jacob Abbott. His series of histories, and stories illustrative of moral truths, have 
furnished amusement and instruction to thousands. He has the knack of piquing 
and gratifying curiosity. In the book before us he shows his happy faculty of impart- 
ing useful infoi-mation through the medium of a pleasant nan-ative, keeping alire the 
interest of the young reader, and fixing in: his memory valuable truths.— 3/ercMj*^, New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Jacob Abbott is almost the only writer in the Englisli language who knows how to 
combine real amusement with real instruction in such a manner that the eager young 
readers are quite as- much interested in the useful knowledge he imparts as in the story 
which he makes so pleasant a medium of instruction. — Buffalo Commercial Advertiser. 

* * * Mr. Abbott has avoided the errors so common with writers for popular effect, 
that of slurring over the difficulties of the subject through the desire of making it intel- 
hgible and attractive to unlearned readers. He never tampers with the truth of science, 
nor attempts to dodge the solution of a knotty problem behind a cloud of plausible illus- 
trations. — N. Y. Tribune. 

PuDLiSHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS, New York. 

CS* Either of the above works sent by mail, postage prepaid, to any part of the United 

States, on receipt of the price. 



MANN'S 

REACTIONARY 




LIFTER 




Is the most remarkable apparatus ever invent- 
ed for IIEAI.TH EXERCISE. NO 

WEIGHTS USED. While adapted to the 
powers of the athlete, it is equally so to wo- 
men and children, or to persons in the most 
delicate state of health. A few minutes' ex- 
ercise each day is sufficient, and if taken at 
night induces refreshing sleep. It is at once 
more beautiful, compact, and durable, besides 
being much cheaper, than any other good ap- 
paratus for similar purposes. Books and cir- 
culars sent free on application. Call and see 
it, at the REACTIONARY LIFTER OFFICE, 
20J Broadway, Kew York. 



What is the Health-Lift, and what does it 
do ? are Questions daily asked. 

Hear Dr. Reilt.y, of Chicago. 
"TnE Hr.ALTu-LiFT is no longer an experi- 
ment, but an assured success as a mode of treat- 
ment. It is not merely a system of Exercise 
which aims to increase muscular strength and 
development : sawinrj ivood will do this, and 
leave the sawyer as rheumatic or dyspejitic as 
before This svstem does not make large muscles, hnt firm iierves; it does not teach one to 'do 
the double trap'eze,' but it enables him to do brisiness more succeasfullg and easily. It is nearer a 
specific for Dyspepsia, Jiheumatisvi, Neuralgia, and many Disorders of the Brain and JSiervous Sys- 
tem than can be found in any drug-store. And it will as certainly cure these ailments, or materi- 
ally alleviate them, as fire will warm the body. It is so simple, unpretending, and quiet in its op- 
eration that probably no system ever excited so much skepticism and incredulity before. But its 
stoutest adhei-ents to-day were its most incredulous investigators at first." 

Dr Janes, of New York, says:— "Where the difficulty is simple weakness; or where deformity 
exists • or where displacement of organs has resulted, from whatever cause ; or where congestion, 
or unequal or torpid circulation deranges the system; or where pain exists, resulting from con- 
gestion or unequal nervous action ; or where there is nertous debility, from over mental action or 
excess ; or where digestion is impaired, or constipation exists, the powerful and beneficial action 
of graduated lifting speedily produces relief. , . , , ^ i x- ■> i. 

" In diseases peculiar to women, Lifting, by furnishing proper physical and mental stimulus, has 
proved most efficient as a method of cure. , , , ^, ■,■ ^- ..x. ^ 
"In short, by presenting an agreeable form of exercise, capable of so gentle application that 
the most delicate invalid can safely attempt it, and, on the other hand, becoming the most pow- 
erful agent known for physical culture and development, it is available to all who need bodily ex- 
ercise — and who does not need it ?" 

THE CHEAPEST AND BEST APPARATUS FOR LIFTING. 

Read what disinterested witnesses say. 

"One of the gi^at inventions of the day is 'Mann's Reactionary Lifter,' which enables a man 
to gain streno-th, health, and vital power by the simple process of lifting himself. That the lift- 
ing of heavy wei"-hts is the most scientific form of exercise for sedentary men ever invented is a 
fact which has been established by the consenting testimony of hundreds of our ablest physicians 
and scientists who have tried ' Butler's Lilting Cure.' Mr. Mann's Apparatus is certainly simpler, 
more convenient, and less expensive than the Butler machines'. It is worthy the careful attention 
and study of all who feel an interest in such machines."— X Y. Evening Mail, Jan 4, 1S71. 

* * * " Two or three different kinds of Lifting Machines are now in use ; but the simplest, and 
by far the cheapest and best, is that called 'Mann's Reactionary Lifter.' We are using one of 
these machines ourselves, and with excellent results. It is so constructed that the most feeble 
i)ersous can work it with entire safetv, and it can be used by ladies, in company with gentlemen, 
without auv chano'e of dress. We predict that ' Mann's Reactionary Lifter ' will soon become an 
indispensable piece of household furniture, and do an amount of good which never can be com- 
puted." — N. Y. Independent, June 1, 1871. 

Ge^jts :— Before I learned that yonr "Reactionary Lifter " was in the market, I had, by a year's 
exrperience of the Lift Cure, become satisfied that no form of exercise whatever approached it m 
cffcctivGUGSS 

Your machine is by all odds the least expensive, most convenient and sensible apparatus of 
the kind I have ever seen. Samuel C. Kenxedv, 132 Broadway, N. Y. 



Gents : 
ing to 



From Prof. T. F. Seward, Editor of X. Y. Musical Gazette. 
<TS :— I derived great benefit last year from the exercise of lifting heavy weights accord- 
Dr. Butler's system. Having tried your " Reactionary Lifter" for accomplishing this mode 



too patent to need comment. Tueo. F. Sewaed. 

Mann's Reaction aky Lifter Co. : New York, July IT, 1S71. 

From my personal experience of the benefits to be derived from a systematic and intelligent 
use of the '"' Lifting- Cure" in general, I would particularly state in reference to your special ma- 
chine that, after havin<^ used it for some four months myself, I am fully satisfied that in its effects 
it is equal, if not superior, to any other with which I am acquainted, while for cheapness and por- 
tability it is equaled by none. Yours truly, Hoeatio Gomez, M.D. 

Address MANN'S REACTIONARY LIFTER CO., 200 Sroadway, N. Y. 



LEE & SHEPARD'S 

THREE FASCINATING STORY TELLERS, 



OLIVER OPTIC, 



ELIJAH KELLOGG, 



SOPHIE MAY, 



Have contributed for the plearnre and profit of Young America the following books, which are 
all issued in handsome style, fully illustrated. 



BY OLIVER OPTIC. 



{ Inprep- 
r aration. 



YOUNG AMERICA ABROAD. 

Price pe' vol., |1 50. 

Outward Bound. 
Shamrock and Thistle. 
Eed Cross. 
Dikes and Ditches. 
Palace and Cottage. 
Down the Rhine. 
Up the Baltic. 
Korthern Lands. "] 
Cross and Crescent 
Sunny Shores. 
Vine and Olive. 
Isles of the Sea. J 

ARaiY AND NAVY STORIES. 

Price per vol., $1 50. 

The Soldier Boy. 
The Young Lieutenant. 
Fighting Joe. 
The Sailor Boy. 
The Yankee Middj'. 
Brave Old Salt. 

WOODVILLE STORIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

Rich and Humble. 
In School and Out. 
■\Vatch and Wait. 
Work and Win. 
Hope and Have. 
Haste and Waste. 

RIVERDALE STORIES. 

Price per vol., 43 cts. 

Little Merchant. 
Young Voyagers. 
Christmas Gift. 
Dolly and I. 
Uncle Ben. 
Birthday Party. 
Proud and Lazy. 
Careless Kate. 
Robinson Crusoe, Jr. 
The Picnic Party. 
The Gold Thimble. 
The Do-Somcthings. 



LAKE SHORE SERIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

Through by Daylight. 

Lightning Express. 

On Time. 

Switch Off. 

Brake Up. 

Bear and Forbear. 

THE STARRY FLAG SERIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

The Starry Flag. 
Breaking Away. 
Seek and Find. 
Freaks of Fortune. 
Make or Break. 
Down the River. 

THE BOAT CLUB SERIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

The Boat Club. 
All Aboard. 
Now or Never. 
Try Again. 
Poor and Proud. 
Little by Little. 

Upward and Onward Series. 

Price per vol., §1 25. 

Field and Forest. 
Plane and Plank. 
Desk and Debit. 
Cringle and Cross-Tree. 
Bivouac and Battle. 
Sea and Shore. In press. 

BY ELIJAH KELLOGG. 



ELM ISLAND STORIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

Lion Ben of Elm Island. 
Charlie Bell of Elm Island. 
The Ark of Elm Island. 
The Boy Farmers of Elm 

Island. 
The Young Shipbuilders of 

Elm Island. 
The Ilardscrabble of Elm 

Island. 



PLEASANT COVE STORIES. 

Price per vol., $1 25. 

Arthur Brown ; the Young 
Captain. 

The Young Deliverers of Pleas- 
ant Cove. 

The Cruise of the Casco. 

WHISPERING PINE SERIES. 

Price per vol., f 1 25. 

The Spark of Genius ; or, the 
College Life of James Traftou. 

The Sophomores of Radcliffe ; 
or, James Traftou and his 
Bosom Friends. 

BY SOPHIE MAY. 



PRUDY STORIES. 

Price per vol., "5 cts. 

Little Prndy. 

Little Prndy's Sister Snsy. 
Little Prndy's Captain Horace. 
Little Prndy's Cousin Grace. 
Little Prndy's Story-Book. 
Little Prudf 's Dotty Dimple. 

DOTTY DIMPLE STORIES. 

Price per vol., 75 cts. 

Dotty Dimple at her Grandmo- 
ther's. 
Dotty Dimple at Home. 
Dotty Dimple out West. 
Dotty Dimple at Play. 
Dotty Dimple at School. 
Dotty Dimple's Flyaway. 

PRUDY'S FLYAWAY SERIES. 

Price per vol., 75 cts. 

Little Folks Astray. 
Prudy Keeping House. 
AuntMadge's Story. 

The Doctor's Danghtcr. $1 50. 



These popular writers also contribute regularly to 
THE BEST JU-VEISriL,E TvIAOAZIINE IT^ THE AVOIILD, 

OLIVER OPTIC'S MAGAZINE, 

Under the Editorial Control of Oi.ivr.u Orrio, nnd containing more and better reading-matter 
and illustrations than any other Magazine for young people published. 

Tenns : $2 50 a year ; ''25 cts. a number. Scud for a specimen, which will be mailed free. 



LEE A SHEPAKD, PUBLISHERS, BOSTON. 

LEE, SHEPARD, & DILLINGH.VM, NEW YORK. 



T-lTriTWipj 



HARPER'S WEEKLY. 

lo ce7its a Number ; $4 00 a Year. 

Originally intended to be a pictorial record of noteworthy events occurring in ever}- 
part of the world, as well as a popular medium of popular informatioa and amusement, 
it has become, without losing these features, a very powerful organ of political opin- 
ion. Its leading articles on domestic and foreign questions and political events are 
distinguished by weight of argument and force of style, while never offensive m tone 
nor transcending the limits of cultivated journalism. The plan on which it is con- 
ducted necessitates the reliance upon foreign sources for the illustration of events oc- 
curring in Europe and other parts of the Old World, although original sketches, sent 
from abroadj are frequently engraved for its pages ; and some of the best pictures it 
has given have been from the pencils of American artists. Among these we may men- 
tion the powerful political cartoons of Mr. Nast, which, for several years, have been a 
prominent feature in the paper. — N. Y. Times. 

The best publication of its class in America, and so far ahead of all other weekly 
journals as not to permit of any comparison between it and any of their number. Its 
columns contain the finest collections of reading-matter that are printed. * * * Its illus- 
trations are numerous and beautiful, being furnished by the chief artists of the comitry. 
— Boston Traveller. 

Harper^ s Weekly is the best and most interesting illustrated newspaper. Nor does 
its value depend on its illustrations alone. Its reading-matter is of a high order of 
literary merit — varied, instructive, entertaining, and unexceptionable. — AC Y. Sun. 

Harper's Weekly deserves its primacy in this class of publications, alike for the value 
of its reading-matter and the excellence of its illustrations. The spirited and telling 
pictorial satires of Nast are a power in society, and are dictated in aid of a sound pub- 
lic opinion, and against public wrongs and follies. The editorials on public affairs are 
models of discussion, weighty and temperate, supporting high principles in aa elevated 
tone and a chastened literary style. — Examiner and Chronicle^ 

The latest addition to Harper's Weekly is the admirable supplements which it prints 
with each number. These supplements represent the addition to the Weekly of a paper 
h; If as large as the ordinary Harper's used to be. The publishers now boast that it is 
larger than any other illustrated paper published weekly, and there seems to be good 
reason to admit the claim. It is gratifying to see so much enterprise employed in 
catering to the public taste. — N. Y. World. 

The friends of truth, liberty, and law owe much to Messrs. Harper & Brothers, and 
every one of such ought to show his appreciation of their course by subscribing for 
Harper's Weekly, or, having it already, induce at least one other person to foDow his 
example. — Boston Commercial Bulletin. 

It has become one of our American institutions. No family is completely happy 
without it. — Philadelphia City Item. 

What's the use in our praising Harper's Weekly ? It is so popular that no words 
^f ours can help it, and it is so good that we do not see how it can be better, and yet 
t is better each week. Whereunto it will attain is a theorem more difficult than the 
\nomial.^ Watchman and Reflector. 

^More enterprise than ever is being displayed in this popular weekly. The illus- 
ions are more numerous and marked by better judgment in the selection of sub- 
and greater beauty of tx^cution.— Philadelphia Inquirer. 




M^.'','i3f^r'' % 



•i^'^-'py 






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